September 2013 Newsletter | International Collage Center
Exhibition and collection updates, interview with Adam King | Click to view this email in a browser

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September 2013

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Welcome to our September newsletter

The ICC has a busy fall ahead! Stay connected by joining our Facebook page where we post all our events and other collage-related articles and news.

In this month's newsletter find details on Remix public programs at the Katonah Museum of Art including a Manhattan and Brooklyn studio tour with ICC artists; COMMUNITY ReMIX for adults and families, with a demonstration of collage techniques by Josh Dorman, and join artists Judy Pfaff, Michael Oatman and Mario Naves for a special exhibition walk-through and discussion.

We are delighted to announce the launch of our series "Constructive Conversation" at the Brooklyn Museum Sackler Center for Feminist Art with the panel discussion "Fashioning Personae: a conversation about collage, gender and feminism" with artists Colette, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and K8-Hardy moderated by distinguished art historian and author Judith Rodenbeck. We also invite you to learn more about our permanent lending and research collection through featured selections of new gifts and additional collection works.

Finally, this month's studio focus artist is with artist Adam King. We hope you enjoy the discussion on British collage, architecture and utopias. We look forward to seeing you and wish you a happy fall!


Exhibitions

Last chance to see Remix

Closes October 13, 2012

See Remix: Selections from the ICC at the Katonah Museum of Art. Presenting the work of over 100 artists drawn from the ICC's permanent lending and research collection alongside further loans from prominent artists.

Join us for these events in September and October

Josh Dorman, Tailspin, 2009

Josh Dorman, Tailspin, 2009
Ink, acrylic and antique maps on panel
36 x 32 inches
Collection International Collage Center
Gift of the artist and Mary Ryan Gallery, New York
©Josh Dorman

COMMUNITY ReMIX
September 22 at 3:00 pm

For adults and families. Visiting artist Josh Dorman will demonstrate his unique
 collage style.

Adults: members free, $10 non-members. Children ages 3 and up: $3 members, $5 non-members. Become a member at the door for FREE entry!

Talk with collage artists Judy Pfaff, Michael Oatman, and Mario Naves
Saturday, October 5, 1–2pm

A conversational exhibition walk-through.

Free with Museum admission.

Lisa Hoke with a site-specific installation

Collage Artists' Studio Tour in Manhattan and Brooklyn
Saturday, September 28, 10am–5pm

Guided by exhibition curators Pavel Zoubok and Rachael Lawe, visit the studios of collage artists Joel Carreiro, Lisa Hoke, Selena Kimball, and Aaron Wexler.



Prepaid reservations required. $75 members, $85 non-members; includes lunch and luxury coach. Bus leaves from the KMA at 9am.

Contact Katonah Museum of Art for details.


Events, Projects and Collaborations

Save the Date!

Fashioning Personae: A Conversation About Collage, Gender and Feminism

The first event in the "Constructive Conversation" series

Saturday, October 26, 2–3pm

The Sackler Center for Feminist Art and International Collage Center present a panel discussion "Fashioning Personae: a conversation about collage, gender and feminism" with panelists Colette, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and K8-Hardy moderated by Judith Rodenbeck at the Brooklyn Museum Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

Collage has a powerful feminist history. From its earliest Dada moments through the formulation of "femmage" in Melissa Meyer and Miriam Schapiro's groundbreaking text Waste Not Want Not: An Inquiry into What Women Saved and Assembled—FEMMAGE (1977–78) to contemporary mash-ups, its use has enabled forceful reappraisals and critiques of artistic traditions and hierarchies, as well as a hidden history of feminist production. There have always been plural feminisms. How might this plurality, which mobilizes an open-ended set of questions rather than a set of answers, inform contemporary practice? Contemporary collage-based practice extends from purely material works to artists' use of collage strategies for creative self-fashioning, to inhabit different personae and to assemble identities. This radicalized and strategic collage performance literalizes the concept of gender construction; artists use the constructed form that is collage to question the fixity not just of the image but of identity. This panel will explore the feminist arc of such contemporary collage practice.

The ICC and the Sackler Center have invited three artists who have made and continue to make significant contributions to this area: Colette, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and K8-Hardy, each of whom has developed a complex practice interrogating the traditional understanding of gender in multiple collage-based mediums, including the development of artistic personae. This panel invites these three trailblazers of the contemporary vanguard to consider collage's impact on gender theory, and how this informed their own unique artistic responses. They will also be asked to consider the evolution in the understanding of gender and identity in the global, hybrid, technology-driven twenty-first century. The panel will be moderated by art historian and critic Judith Rodenbeck, whose work on questions of performance in visual and time-based arts approaches scholarship itself as a mode of cultural collage.


Studio Focus: Adam King

Adam King

Adam King

Adam King studio at Britannia Works, East London

Adam King studio at Britannia Works, East London

Adam King studio at Britannia Works, East London

Adam King studio at Britannia Works, East London

International Collage Center  In your practice like many contemporary artists, you produce works incorporating collage alongside drawing and site-specific installation. Could you speak about your particular collage approach and how this informs other modes of art making?

Adam King  I use collage for a number of different reasons. In am interested in collage both as physical material and as image that brings traces of its original context into the work. Also collage as tendency and impulse.

In a 2D landscape such as Architectural Pastoral (Humboldt's field trip Mysteries), 2009–11, I include photographs of degraded factories, a sailing ship and a destroyed house from a hurricane. All of these were cut out of National Geographic magazine. These images bring with them the glossy contemporary magazine materials that suggests as well as the images that speak of discovery, exploration and colonization of the environment.

In the introduction to the Remix catalogue Thomas Piche Jr. notes that

For women, ethnic and racial minorities, gays and lesbians, the medium of collage lent an ephemeral, dislocated character to their work that questioned modernist expectations of gravity and truth.

I think this is evident in qualities in my own work in which Nature as the "Other" is in dialogue and tension with the modernist, urban environment. Also linking to this is the idea of subversion and in my work I often cut into consumerist images and give then an amoeba-like curvy contour that suggests the organic or partially paint or decorate with glitter and stickers to give them an exotic quality. It's to do with transforming the image that gives them another identity and then contextualizing these in new scenarios.

My application of the collage medium has changed over time. In early landscapes I used to cut out colored print and images from magazines and 'paint' with these materials building up form and volume through manipulation of scale and tone to create the illusion of space on a 2D surface. Later works such as Humboldt's reveal surfaces that are more ruptured and include other materials such as paint. My 3D works and installations are often collaged assemblages of second hand materials and images transformed into frangible structures and creepy environments.

Adam King, Architectural Pastoral (Humboldt's field trip Mysteries), 2009–2011

Adam King
Architectural Pastoral (Humboldt's field trip Mysteries), 2009–2011
Mixed media collage on paper
Collection International Collage Center

Adam King, Consume and Survive, 2005

Adam King
Consume and Survive, 2005
Collage
9 x 11 inches
Collection International Collage Center

ICC  In the ICC collection we have two of your pieces, Consume and Survive, 2005 and Architectural Pastoral (Humboldt's field trip Mysteries), 2009–11. Both works represent your interest in exploring the construction of utopias and sci-fi. Of course the ideas in sci-fi and the creation of utopias, often represent the most astute appraisal and representation of current culture. Could you speak about the works in the ICC collection and how visions of the future emerge in your work?

AK  Architectural Pastoral develops several of the themes that have interested me a lot over the years. In this landscape an idyll is shown as site of study and exploration but also of encroachment—by the urban built environment and industry. A bold geometric pathway composed of colorful vinyl that references modernist architecture dissects the landscape. The angular edges are in turn gradually being encroached upon by nature that appears to be reasserting itself. The use of gouache and collaged images applied in a painterly way along with bits of glued fur act as counterpoint and in an ironic way appear to 'pollute' the modernist areas. The result is a fractured surface in a state of flux and tension that explores these forces at work.

Architectural Pastoral to me is a dystopia and yet shot through with a sense of optimism. This is explored through the bright color and playful handling that in some ways belies the decay and alludes to celebration. It's an image of an environment that points to possible redemption in a future of co-existence or perhaps in the landscape returning to an unspoilt idyll.

Consume and Survive is a study of insects devouring each other. I took reference for this image from an old Nature encyclopedia. I cut out the shapes of insects' body parts from consumerist images of vacuum cleaners and hair dryers and assembled on paper. There's more straightforward reference to sci-fi here in ideas of genetic experimentation and what nature might one day evolve into in a futuristic technological environment. The images of the insects are placed on flat grounds of florescent color that suggests a modern context. As with Humboldt's there is a sense of nature asserting itself and coming through in forms and environments that speak of man-made civilization.

READ OUR COMPLETE CONVERSATION WITH ADAM KING →


Collection

Central to this unique cultural resource is our permanent lending and research collection exploring vital links between historical and contemporary practices. Through the continued growth of the collection we establish a narrative that traces the evolution of collage as both an aesthetic and cultural model.

Collection news

New gifts and selections from the collection:

Michael Pajon, b.1979
Scavenging Beaks Leave Little to the Lamp Drawn Moths, 2013
Mixed media collage with hand drawing and book covers
13 x 34 inches
Collection International Collage Center
Gift of Nick Mayor and Jessica Bride

Nora Aslan, b.1937
Microscopy, 2003
Collage on canvas
27 1/4 x 27 1/4 inches
Collection International Collage Center
Gift of Dr. Donald Rothfeld, in memory of Harriet Weill Rothfeld

 

Felipe Jesus Consalvos, 1891–1950s
One Wild Girl, c.1920–1950
Double sided mixed media collage on canvas
14 x 11 inches
Collection International Collage Center
Gift of Fleisher / Ollman Gallery, Philadelphia
All rights and reproductions of Felipe Jesus Consalvos' work courtesy of Doodletown Farm, LLC and Fleisher Ollman Gallery


Support the ICC!

The generous support of individuals like YOU will ensure the success of this unique cultural resource. As an emerging organization your donations are vital and make a significant and visible impact. Please contact Rachael Lawe to discuss donations rlawe@Internationalcollage.org

Mission

ICC – Exploring the art and culture of collage from Picasso to the digital age

The International Collage Center (ICC) is dedicated to the study and appreciation of Collage and its related forms, from Modernism to the digital age. Through our permanent lending and research collection and varied programming we promote community and scholarship within the field and consider the role of Collage within a larger cultural dialogue.

The ICC collection explores vital links between historical and contemporary practices, establishing a narrative of Collage as both an aesthetic and cultural model. We also maintain a comprehensive archive of reference materials. These resources are established through generous gifts from artists, estates, collectors and arts professionals.

In partnership with leading experts and other institutions, the ICC produces diverse public programs, exhibitions and publications. These initiatives highlight Collage's rich history and its evolution in a technologically driven future.

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