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May 2015
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Apiconsult News, May 2015
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Dear Friends,

Welcome to this addition of Apiconsult News.  My apologies for not being in touch for some time. 
  
I have been living in Ireland for the past number of years having moved back here with my family from Kenya.  I still however have my bees and apiary at Nakuru and travel back regularly to Kenya to check on my bees and visit beekeepers.  I am involved in development work and travel back and forth to Africa regularly.    

I am also keeping bees here in Ireland and the differences between my two apiaries is interesting! Yesterday I was out at the Irish apiary with my local bee club for a number of hours during the day and didn't even get one sting!  What a difference from my Kenyan bees and apiary.  
I think this is where a lot of confusion comes from in beekeeping in Africa.  If you read a beekeeping book from Europe or America it may tell you to check your bees every 7-9 days or so to break down queen cells to prevent swarming.  Working with my bees in Africa that would simply not be workable!  The bees are too defensive.  Good beekeeping is all about coming up with appropriate management for the bees and taking account of the circumstances you are working in.  As a beekeeper you must start where you are and learn/understand what equipment and bee management practices are appropriate for your particular circumstances. 
The African Beekeeping Resource Centre (ABRC), a Kenyan registered NGO of which I am a founding member, is working to document/discern the most appropriate beekeeping practices for Africa.  ABRC is currently talking to some of the best beekeepers in Kenya to document what they know and do which makes them successful beekeepers.  This knowledge will be shared with other beekeepers in Eastern Africa so that they can maximise the potential of their beekeeping enterprises and not be confused by bee management practices designed for different bees and circumstances.   

I invite you to read more about the work of ABRC below.  

Many thanks and best wishes,

Tom Carroll, May 5th 2015

Please like Apiconsult on Social Media and Share with your friends: 
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African Beekeeping Resource Centre
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The African Beekeeping Resource Centre (ABRC) is a not-for-profit South based NGO registered in Kenya working on beekeeping development across Africa researching, educating and lobbying for knowledge and environments that will: maximise bee husbandry, increase the trade in bee products, protect and enhance bee forage and habitat, and find ways to use beekeeping and honey hunting for wider benefit.

Please see the ABRC website for further information:


ABRC is also on Facebook and Twitter.  If you like what ABRC are working on please Like and Share with your friends on social media to promote the work of ABRC to develop beekeeping in Africa.  
Thank you!

Please see links below:



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Food for Thought:

"If a beekeeper tells you he knows what he's doing, be wary and keep a keen eye on this fellow, for he has already told one lie, and no doubt will tell you another." (author unknown)

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 "Its all about coming up with appropriate management for the bees and circumstances you are working in"
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