Research
 at Princeton


January 2017
 
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New materials for LEDs

Self-assembling particles brighten future of LED lighting

Princeton researchers have refined the manufacturing of light sources made with crystalline substances known as perovskites, a more efficient and potentially lower-cost alternative to LEDs.
 


X-ray enhancement

Princeton's IP Accelerator Fund supports new technologies

A technology for improving X-ray images is one of six projects selected to receive support from Princeton’s IP Accelerator Fund, which helps transition projects from the lab to products and services for the benefit of society.
 


Namibia - patterns in nature

In African 'fairy circles,' a template for nature's many patterns

Large-scale vegetation patterns in arid ecosystems, such as the "fairy circles" of Namibia, form not from a single overarching cause but rather from millions of local interactions among neighboring plants and animals.
 


Social mobility

Movin' on up? Views on social mobility shape Americans' faith in the status quo

Psychologists at Princeton University and Memorial University of Newfoundland have found that how Americans view social mobility affects their willingness to defend the basic underpinnings of American society.
 

 
Elephants

Top stories you may have missed in 2016

Check out these not-to-be-missed stories from 2016.
 
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Events
Free and open to the public
PPPL

Science on Saturdays

This lecture series features Princeton University scientists and researchers from other institutions.
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
100 Stellarator Road, Princeton, New Jersey

Saturdays at 9:30 a.m.
Feb. 4, Feb. 11, Feb. 18, Mar. 4, Mar. 18

The Southern Ocean's role in climate and biological productivity

Jorge Sarmiento, Princeton University's George J. Magee Professor of Geoscience and Geological Engineering and professor of geosciences, will discuss the climatic and biological importance of the Southern Ocean.
Guyot Hall, Room 10
Tuesday, Feb. 7, 12:30 p.m.

The future of neutrino research

Jo Dunkley, a Princeton University professor of physics and astrophysical sciences, will discuss efforts to better understand the nature of neutrinos.
Jadwin Hall, Room A10
Thursday, Feb. 9, 4:00 p.m.

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Research at Princeton is produced by the Office of the Dean for Research

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