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Sabbath School

The Day of the Lord
by  JIM PARK


This week’s Sabbath School lesson focuses on the entire third chapter of Second Peter and contains much instruction for those waiting for the Second Advent.  It addresses several real problems with the delay of His Coming, both from the perspective of a believer and non-believer.




Voices


Drop the Mic: Reincarnating the Adventist Faith Part 5
by TODD LEONARD


“We have this hope that burns within our hearts/Hope in the coming of the Lord.”1 The soon coming of Christ, the end of evil, the death of death; no more crying, mourning or pain; a new heaven and a new earth—these are the angelic trumpet blasts of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. More than one Adventist leader has said that when we lose sight of Christ’s second coming and the promise of the new earth, we’ll lose our energy and drive. We will be a church without a mission. We will have lost our reason for our existence. Our eschatological DNA was birthed in the Millerite mistake of date-setting Christ’s return, self-named and self-identified as last-day people when we organized as a denomination, and passed on from generation to generation as we evangelized the world in our desire to get as many people right with God so they will greet the return of Jesus with joy instead of terror.


Interviews


New Film Tells the Story of the Whitecoats―Adventist Soldiers in Biodefense
by ALITA BYRD


Randall Larsen talks about his documentary Operation Whitecoat, remembering a U.S. Army program during the Cold War that used Adventist soldiers as medical test subjects.

Question: You have just produced a movie called Operation Whitecoat about a U.S. Army program that young Seventh-day Adventist men were part of between 1954 and 1973. Can you tell us a little bit more about the Whitecoats?



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London Unity Conference Set to Reframe Conversation about Church Authority
by BONNIE DWYER

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Which came first in Adventism, discussion of women’s ordination or discussion of unity? All three words seemingly have been worn out in the conversations about them, particularly in the last ten years, but really since the beginnings of the church in the 1860s. Does the conversation change depending on whether or not you are in a division conference office, or a union, or a local conference office?


God's Last Choice: Overcoming Ellen White's Gender and Women in Ministry During the Fundamentalist Era Part 1
by KEVIN M. BURTON

2017-06-14%20EGW%20by%20Kevin%20M.%20Burton%20Part%201
Seventh-day Adventism was wholly reinvented in the 1920s and 1930s.[1] Though the organizational structure did not change much after 1918, the church prior to this time was fundamentally different from the church that was created during the interwar years. Most Adventists are unaware of this reinvention and George R. Knight has correctly argued that many Adventists in the early twenty-first century incorrectly look back to “the years between 1920 and 1960 . . . as the era of ‘Historic Adventism.’”[2] This article supports Knight’s assessment through the lenses of unity, authority, and gender. Simply put, there was a time in which Adventists were united by a simple covenant: to keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus Christ. There was a time in which local churches were governed congregationally and in which a local conference, a union, or the General Conference, had no authoritative control over their daily operations. There was a time in which church policy did not prohibit women from serving as conference presidents or forbid their ordination to the gospel ministry. This was a time in which Adventists, and their churches, were autonomous and united.

 If This is Our Father’s World, Why Won’t We Call It Home?
by MATTHEW QUARTLEY

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How do we avoid villainizing this world in favor of the one to come? The answer may lie in understanding why we’re here, in this world. We may all agree that our Christian duty should align with the gospel commission. But how do we do this? Our evangelism template has historically involved teaching about Jesus to attract new converts. And we have traditionally highlighted his second coming. It is this emphasis that has perhaps unintentionally led us to denigrate the present world, as we “talk up” the promised kingdom.


Quality of Newbold Education on Par with State-Funded Universities
by TRANS-EUROPEAN DIVISION and JOHN BAILDAM

NewboldCollege
How do we avoid villainizing this world in favor of the one to come? The answer may lie in understanding why we’re here, in this world. We may all agree that our Christian duty should align with the gospel commission. But how do we do this? Our evangelism template has historically involved teaching about Jesus to attract new converts. And we have traditionally highlighted his second coming. It is this emphasis that has perhaps unintentionally led us to denigrate the present world, as we “talk up” the promised kingdom.





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