Conservation Connection - August 2015 Click to view this email in a browser

August 2015

In this issue:

• Wildfire Info
• BC National Park
• Forest Team
• Membership
• Teanaway Rancher
• Wolverines


 
Wildfires in Eastern Washington grew rapidly this month. Screengrab from the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.

Wildfires in Eastern Washington grew rapidly last week.
Photo: Screengrab from the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.




Information on Washington wildfires
As you surely know, it has been harrowing month for many residents of Washington due to major wildfires. Because of the direct impact of these wildfires on our work and on our staff, colleagues, friends and supporters, we have been doing our best to share the latest information on these wildfires as well as some unique perspectives through our CNW Fire Dispatch blog series.

We also recommend checking the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center Large Fire Map or the InciWeb Washington updates page for the latest fire information. This map from MappingSupport.com also has very detailed information on current fires, weather and wind direction, as well as historical burn areas.

We will continue posting regular Fire Dispatches and other updates and links to our Facebook and Twitter pages during the coming weeks in order to help keep our conservation community, as well as local, state and federal decision makers, informed on this important topic.

Stay safe out there folks. And a heartfelt THANK YOU to all the firefighters, first responders, National Guard, U.S. Army servicemen and women and others bravely putting their lives on the line for our communities this fire season!

 
Grasslands in the South Okanagan-Similkameen, British Columbia. Photo: Graham Osborne for the South Okanagan-Similkameen National Park Network (SOSNPN)

Grasslands in the South Okanagan-Similkameen, British Columbia.
Photo: Graham Osborne for the South Okanagan-Similkameen National Park Network (SOSNPN)



Proposal for new Okanagan National Park
This month, British Columbia announced the start of public comment on proposals for new wildlands protections in the South Okanagan-Similkameen region, including a new Canadian national park reserve bordering north-central Washington.

We strongly support a new Canadian national park reserve in the South Okanagan-Similkameen, and are committed to continue working with First Nations and local communities in their pursuit of secure protections for cultural and natural resources.

Designation of a new South Okanagan-Similkameen National Park would permanently secure wildlands protections and cross-border habitat connectivity for wildlife in this unique area. After many years of advocating for greater protections for this unique and biodiversity rich region, we're thrilled to see this progress taking shape!

 




Conservation Associate Jen Watkins talks to supporters about improving watershed conditions and habitat connectivity around Snoqualmie Pass. Photo: Kent Sullivan

Conservation Associate Jen Watkins talks to supporters about improving watershed conditions and habitat connectivity around Snoqualmie Pass.
Photo: Kent Sullivan



Forest Field Program fights for our trees
Since 1989, our Forest Field Program has advocated for sustainable and ecologically sound management of public forests in the Pacific Northwest.

From selectively thinning forests to closing and replanting unnecessary roads, the team works to restore our national forests and increase their ecological resilience. In turn, they're improving forest management and making forests healthier and more sustainable for people and wildlife.

Learn more about the team and their important work for healthy forests in this new in-depth profile article.

 



Conservation Northwest members and supporters brave the rain for field trip to Snoqualmie Pass. Photo: Kent Sullivan

Conservation Northwest members and supporters brave the rain for field trip to Snoqualmie Pass.
Photo: Kent Sullivan



Members support a wilder Northwest
Conservation Northwest members are essential for sustaining our work for wildlife and wildlands in Washington state and British Columbia. If you aren't a member already, will you join us for only $35 a year?

Members help fund our key programs; from promoting coexistence with wolves through non-lethal tools to restoring North Cascades grizzly bears to improving public forest management.

And they give us strength when we meet with agency heads, community leaders, elected officials and other decision makers. They know we represent thousands of families across the Northwest committed to healthy and wild future for both people and wildlife.

Memberships with Conservation Northwest help protect the remarkable natural heritage our region holds dear. But we can't do it without your support!

 



Range rider moving cattle in the Teanaway Valley. Photo: Laura Owens

Range rider moving cattle in the Teanaway Valley.
Photo: Laura Owens



Rancher supports coexistence with wolves
For the past three years, we've partnered with Ellensburg rancher Sam Kayser of SK Ranch to help implement range riding, fladry and other non-lethal conflict avoidance measures on his grazing allotments in the Teanaway Valley and Colockum areas of Central Washington. Areas home to two important Washington wolf packs.

Recently, Kayser, his range rider Bill Johnson, SK Ranch and our collaborative Range Rider Pilot Project were featured in two excellent articles in The Seattle Times and The Yakima Herald.

As you'll see in the articles, we're not the only ones that believe that coexistence between people, wolves and livestock is possible. As Kayser put it: "I want to believe there's room for all of us."

 



Looking for elusive wolverines with Mount Shuksan in the background. Photo: Tess Rooney

Looking for elusive wolverines with Mount Shuksan in the background.
Photo: Tess Rooney



Looking for North Cascades wolverines
Our spring-summer 2015 Wildlife Monitoring Intern, Tess Rooney, just finished her intern program and headed back to the East Coast for veterinary school.

Before she left, she penned this awesome blog post about her experiences helping to lead our Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project and operating a wolverine camera site and "run pole" between Mount Baker and Mount Shuksan.

Check it out to see what she learned and what it's like to be a "citizen scientist" with our monitoring program. Best of luck with all your future endeavors, Tess!

 




Visit our newsletters page for a paper or FLIPBOOK version of our latest newsletter, "Reaching Milestones: Making connections for wildlife".

Thanks for considering a donation to support our work.


Visit us on the following social media platforms:

Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Google Plus

Conservation Northwest
1208 Bay Street #201, Bellingham, WA 98225
info@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
800.878.9950

You can also manage all your Conservation Northwest email subscriptions online.

 




Click to view this email in a browser

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, please reply to this message with "Unsubscribe" in the subject line or simply click on the following link: Unsubscribe

Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W
Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98119
US

Read the VerticalResponse marketing policy.

Try Email Marketing with VerticalResponse!