Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection E-Newsletter

August 2018

Fires and SmokeTogo WolvesEndangered SpeciesI-90 WildlifeGrasslands FireLWCF

Two firefighters overlook the Miriam Fire near White Pass, Washington on August 3, 2018. Photo USDA Forest Service / Justin Gelb

Two firefighters overlook the Miriam Fire near White Pass, Washington on August 3, 2018.
Photo USDA Forest Service / Justin Gelb

Where there's fire, there's smoke

Reflecting on the fires in Eastern Washington and the smoke experienced around our region this month, our Executive Director reflects on what it means, and what we're doing about it.

What shall we do? Adopt policies that reduce carbon immediately (you can help by voting for Initiative 1631 this November!), do a lot more prescribed burning, foster maintenance of defensible space around existing homes, and get used to some smoke.
READ MORE

 
A range rider in northeast Washington from one of the more than seven ranches that have participated in our Range Rider Pilot Project.
A range rider in northeast Washington from one of the more than seven ranches that have participated in our Range Rider Pilot Project, working to keep both wolves and livestock safe.

Statement on wolf legal action, Togo range riding

Lawsuits and polarization haven't worked out well for wolves elsewhere, so we see little upside in spreading those tactics to Washington, where wolf recovery is going relatively well overall. Instead of polarization, our focus is on collaboration and long-term coexistence.

Read more about recent court action involving Washington's wolves in this statement.

Our staff and contract range riders have been in the field day and night working to prevent further livestock conflicts in the
territory of the Togo Wolf Pack. Below is the latest report from our Wolf Program Lead Jay Shepherd, who also helps lead the Northeast Washington Wolf Cattle Collaborative.
RANGE RIDING

 
Lynx are Endangered and need continued protections and recovery actions to avoid extinction in Washington. Photo: Patrick Reeves
Lynx are Endangered and need continued protections and recovery actions to avoid extinction in Washington state.
Photo: Patrick Reeves

Proposed changes to the Endangered Species Act

We've been a staunch supporter, defender, and active participant in the Endangered Species Act throughout our 29 years as an organization. Be it grizzly bears, Canada lynx, wolves, spotted owls or marbled murrelets, the ESA has allowed us and many other groups to work with federal and state agencies to keep wildlife species from falling into the extinction abyss.

It is a bedrock American environmental law that protects our most vulnerable wildlife, provides a backstop against irretrievable loss of our natural heritage, and so deserves our best efforts to protect its future.
ESA THREATS

 
A cougar near Easton Island. This cougar has a tracking collar as part of a wildlife study by the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe. Photo: Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project / CNW
A cougar near Easton Island, where construction on the second I-90 wildlife overcrossing will soon begin. This cougar has a tracking collar as part of a wildlife study by the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe.
Photo: Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project / CNW

I-90 Wildlife Watch update

Since we relaunched the I-90 Wildlife Watch program in 2017, more than 60 wildlife sightings from motorists have informed crossing projects and understanding of wildlife around Snoqualmie Pass.

Learn more about this collaborative effort with state and federal agencies and Central Washington University, and how YOU can help report wildlife sightings between North Bend and Easto in the blog post below!
I-90 WILDLIFE

 
Recently-burned sage-steppe in August 2018 at Gingko State Park near Vantage and the Quilomene Wildlife Area. Photo: Chase Gunnell
Recently-burned sage-steppe in August 2018 at Gingko State Park near Vantage and the Quilomene Wildlife Area.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

Differences between fires in grasslands and forests

With fires burning in the shrub-steppe of Central Washington this summer, we want to highlight the different roles fire plays in grasslands and dry forests.

Read more in the piece below from our Sagelands Program Lead Jay Kehne, who's spent more three decades as a professional conservation scientist working in this part of our state. 
FIRE COMPARISON

 
Senator Maria Cantwell speaks on behalf of LWCF at a rally in Seattle's Green Lake Park on August 13, 2018. Photo: Laurel Baum
Senator Maria Cantwell speaks on behalf of LWCF at a rally in Seattle's Green Lake Park on August 13, 2018.
Photo: Laurel Baum

National coalition urges Congress to reauthorize Land and Water Conservation Fund

Our partners at the National Wildlife Federation and a broad coalition of more than 50 affiliates and partners urged Congress this month to swiftly reauthorize and fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

The program — one of the oldest and most successful conservation programs in U.S. history — conserves public lands and open space, safeguards fish and wildlife habitat, supports outdoor recreation and stewards cultural and historical landmarks.
SAVE LWCF

 
Donate to help support our work

Keeping the Northwest Wild

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Seattle, WA 98119
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