Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection E-Newsletter

September 2018

I-90 CrossingsOkanogan WildlifeColville Forest PlanForest RestorationPark CelebrationBlanchard Protected

Reporters vie for a shot of the nearly-completed Keechelus Wildlife Overcrossing on I-90 east of Snoqualmie Pass. Photo: Chase Gunnell

Reporters vie for a shot of the nearly-completed Keechelus Wildlife Overcrossing on I-90 east of Snoqualmie Pass.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

Construction wrapping up on I-90 wildlife bridges

Three more wildlife undercrossings are now complete and in use by deer and other animals, and construction on the first wildlife bridge over I-90 will be done this fall!

Elk are also using the previously completed Gold Creek and Hyak wildlife undercrossings, showing just how effective these structures can be.

In the spring we'll be working with WSDOT and the Forest Service to plant native vegetation and restore habitat around the new crossings. Want to lend a hand? Reply to this message or contact outreach@conservationnw.org to be added to our volunteer list.

Our habitat restoration planting parties are especially great for large groups or businesses looking to make a difference!
READ MORE

 
In north-central Washington’s Okanogan Valley, more than 350 mule deer a year are hit and killed by vehicles on Highway 97. Photo: Technotr
In north-central Washington’s Okanogan Valley, more than 350 mule deer a year are hit and killed by vehicles on Highway 97.
Photo: Technotr

Critical habitat – and a highway runs through it

I-90 isn’t the only highway in Washington where wildlife need safe passage.

There's a 12-mile span in north-central Washington that's designated as a "high kill area." Along this stretch, drivers grip their steering wheels with tight knuckles as they test their luck and barrel through the migration route of Washington’s largest herd of mule deer.

We're raising funds to purchase a wildlife crossing for Highway 97 to create safer passage for both people and wildlife traveling through the Okanogan Valley. You can be part of this vital project. Every gift, every dollar counts!

One underpass will cost $300,000 to build. Luckily, we are sharing this cost with two key partners, the Mule Deer Foundation and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.
LEARN MORE

 
Sunset from Bald Snow Roadless Area in the Kettle River Mountain Range on the Colville National Forest. Photo: Eric Zamora
Sunset from Bald Snow Roadless Area in the Kettle River Mountain Range on the Colville National Forest.
Photo: Eric Zamora

Colville Forest Plan falls flat on wilderness recommendations

This month, the Colville National Forest released its Revised Forest Plan after 15 years of work to update the guidelines by which these public lands are managed for wilderness, wildlife, recreation, forestry, and other values.

Despite strong local support for more wilderness and vast areas of qualifying pristine wild country, the Revised Plan recommends wilderness protections for only three areas, leaving most quality lands without permanent protection. This is disappointing.

The Forest contains more than 220,000 acres of wilderness-quality lands but less than 3 percent is currently officially designated Wilderness, the smallest amount of any National Forest in the Pacific Northwest! Most notable is the absence of wilderness protections for the vast tracts of wild country in the Kettle River Mountain Range.
READ MORE

 
After two years of work on the South Summit forest restoration project, native plants are flourishing and wildlife are moving back in. Photo: George Wooten
After two years of work on the South Summit forest restoration project, native plants are flourishing and wildlife are moving back in.
Photo: George Wooten

Witnessing habitat return after South Summit restoration project

In Okanogan County, east of Loup Loup Pass and west of Highway 97, we’ve partnered with the U.S. Forest Service since 2016 to decommission and restore miles of unnecessary roads that were putting watersheds and wildlife habitat at risk.

"This project was a great success and showed the benefit of a close working relationship with partners eager to help the USFS complete mutually beneficial projects," said Luke Cerise with the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest.

This work was made possible through generous contributions from Icicle Fund, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, National Forest Foundation, Peach Foundation, Washington Women's Foundation and an anonymous foundation. Thank you!
READ MORE

 
Recently-burned sage-steppe in August 2018 at Gingko State Park near Vantage and the Quilomene Wildlife Area. Photo: Chase Gunnell
We hope you'll join us for this special celebration! And look out for our staffers wearing green CNW t-shirts. 

Choose Your Adventure: Trails, Rivers, and the North Cascades 50th

You’re invited to a celebration of the 50th anniversary of North Cascades National Park on Sunday, October 14 at El Centro De La Raza in Seattle's Beacon Hill neighborhood!

Choose Your Adventure will feature inspirational conversations with authors, scientists, and national park rangers. We'll have film screenings, family activities, artists, storytelling, music, food trucks, dessert, beer and more! Indoor and outdoor events will be held throughout the day.
GET TICKETS

 
Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz speaks from Samish Overlook. Photo Molly Doran / Skagit Land Trust
Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz speaks from Samish Overlook.
Photo: Molly Doran / Skagit Land Trust

Celebrating the protection of Blanchard Mountain

Local residents and outdoor enthusiasts from around the region joined Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz, state legislators, county commissioners and other local elected officials, and conservation, recreation and local business leaders on September 16 to celebrate the permanent protection of Blanchard Mountain, heart of the newly-renamed Harriet Spanel State Forest.

"The permanent protection of Blanchard Mountain is a testament to the power of diverse stakeholders working together in the interest of shared conservation progress," said Mitch Friedman, our Executive Director and a leader on Blanchard Strategies Group negotiations since 2007.

"This is a celebration more than a decade in the making, and a win-win for all involved. We found the sweet spot that allowed outdoor recreationists, conservation groups, school trusts, elected leaders and the DNR to walk away happy."
READ MORE

 
Donate to help support our work

Keeping the Northwest Wild

Facebook TwitterYouTube FlickrGoogle Plus Instagram

Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
communications@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
206.675.9747

Donate
 

 
 



Click to view this email in a browser

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, please reply to this message with "Unsubscribe" in the subject line or simply click on the following link: Unsubscribe

Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W
Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98119
US

Read the VerticalResponse marketing policy.

Try Email Marketing with VerticalResponse!