Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection E-Newsletter

June 2018

New Wildlife CrossingGrizzly FundingYes on 1631Action AlertsPygmy RabbitsWDFW Director

Highway 97 bisects the migration path of Washington’s largest mule deer herd. Help us give them safer passage with wildlife crossings! Photo: WSDOT

Highway 97 bisects the migration path of Washington’s largest mule deer herd. Help us give them safer passage with wildlife crossings!
Photo: WSDOT

Help purchase Washington’s next wildlife crossing

We’ve worked to connect habitat for nearly thirty years, most recently championing wildlife crossings under and over I-90 near Snoqualmie Pass.

But there’s another highway in Washington where people and animals are badly in need of safe passage. And you can be part of the solution.

More than 350 mule deer a year are killed on a 12-mile stretch of Highway 97 in north-central Washington, where this busy road cuts through their migratory path and divides precious habitat for Canada lynx.

We just launched our new Okanogan Wildlife Crossing Campaign to purchase the first wildlife crossing under Highway 97 near the Carter Mountain Wildlife Area. With the donation of this first crossing, our ultimate goal is to encourage the State Legislature to fund additional measures in its 2019 Transportation Budget Bill, solving this collision crisis for good.

But first we need to raise $125,000 for our portion of the new crossing. Please donate today to create safer passage for people and wildlife. It’s easy – just select "Highway 97 Wildlife Crossings" in the Gift Information drop-down menu at the link below!
DONATE FOR WILDLIFE

 
A grizzly bear grazes in a mountain meadow. Photo: Verschoor
A grizzly bear grazes in a mountain meadow.
Photo: Verschoor

Tell Congress to give grizzly bears hope

We need your help once again to ensure grizzly bear recovery moves forward in the North Cascades.

The U.S. House of Representatives is advancing a budget rider that would bring the public process planning for grizzly bear restoration to a halt, dooming the last grizzly bears on the West Coast of the contiguous U.S. We can’t let this happen!

Please contact your U.S. Representative and Senators and urge them to vote NO on Representative Dan Newhouse’s appropriations rider defunding grizzly restoration.
READ MORE

 
Climate initiative supports our program objectives for wildlands and wildlife, Washington’s rural and urban communities, and a healthier future for our planet
Climate initiative supports our work for wildlands and wildlife, Washington’s rural and urban communities, and a healthier future for our planet

Support for Initiative 1631

Conservation Northwest is pleased to announce our endorsement of Washington Initiative 1631!

We believe this approach to addressing climate change is based on sound science and principles of equity and justice for residents of both rural and urban Washington. And it makes unprecedented investments in natural and working landscapes for both reducing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and helping wildlife and people adapt to climate changes that are already underway.

Read more about Initiative 1631, how it works, and how it supports our mission to protect, connect and restore wildlands and wildlife at the link below.
LEARN MORE

 
Our action alerts help ensure that elected officials and agencies hear your voice for mountain caribou protection and other local issues. Photo: David Moskowitz
Our action alerts help ensure that elected officials and agencies hear your voice for mountain caribou protection and other local conservation issues.
Photo: David Moskowitz

Update your address to receive local action alerts

We recently rolled out a new online service to better connect citizens with elected officials, agencies, public comment opportunities, and other ways to take action to keep the Northwest wild (check it out here). But to use it for local issues we need to know where our activists are located!

To update your info, please fill out this form and ensure we have the right address for you. Even you’ve already provided your email, we’ll match your address to it and send you local alerts.

For more than a decade, our WILD NW Action Alerts have a made a BIG difference for local wildlife and wildlands, protecting places like Blanchard Mountain and ensuring recovery plans are in place for species from wolves to mountain caribou.
SIGN-UP FORM

 
A pygmy rabbit after release into Eastern Washington’s sagelands. Photo: Chase Gunnell
A pygmy rabbit after release into Eastern Washington’s sagelands.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

Conserving the cutest sagelands critter

As part of our Sagelands Heritage Program, some of our staffers and a supporter recently joined the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife on a pygmy rabbit conservation project in Douglas County.

In 2001, as few as 16 pygmy rabbits remained in Washington, teetering on the brink of local extinction due to habitat loss and fragmentation. They are still classified as endangered in our state, with the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission recently reaffirming their need for critical protections.

Read about our trip capturing and tagging these tiny rabbits, and how we’re working to protect and connect habitat in the incredible part of our state they call home, in the blog post below.
PYGMY RABBITS

 
We work closely with WDFW on many projects, including fisher restoration. We look forward to working with the new Director to conserve and restore Washington’s natural heritage. Photo: Mitch Parsons, UW
We collaborate with WDFW on many projects, including fisher restoration. We look forward to working with the new Director to conserve and restore Washington’s natural heritage.
Photo: Mitch Parsons, UW

Kelly Susewind selected as new WDFW Director

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission has selected Kelly Susewind as the new Director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Originally from Grays Harbor County, Susewind most recently worked as a senior leader at the State Department of Ecology.

"We thank the Fish and Wildlife Commission for carefully deliberating on the choice of a new director," said Mitch Friedman, Conservation Northwest Executive Director. "We look forward to working with Director Sussewind on conserving the state’s full suite of biodiversity and ensuring that the agency has the financial capacity and social resilience to meet the needs of our growing human population."

"Director Susewind takes over at a critical time for the agency, which is responsible for natural resources that are a core part of Washington’s identity, heritage and lifestyle, as they are at risk from our booming population and rapidly-changing state," said Friedman. "The Department needs a director who can bring people together behind WDFW’s vital mission and persuade the state legislature to provide sufficient funding for it to succeed."
READ MORE

 
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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
communications@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
206.675.9747

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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W
Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98119
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