Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection

December 2016

Fishers · Range Riders · Your Support · I-90 Habitat · Murrelet Plan · Caribou Listing

A fisher bounds through the snow after its release near Mount Rainier this month. Photo: Paul Bannick

A fisher bounds through the snow after its release near Mount Rainier this month.
Photo: Paul Bannick

Fishers Reintroduced at Mount Rainier

This month we partnered with state and federal scientists to reintroduce fishers to Mount Rainier National Park, returning a native species that had been missing for almost 80 years!

This momentous event was the result of a decade of collaboration with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the National Park Service, as well as other federal, tribal and non-profit partners.

Read more about the return of the fisher in articles from The Seattle Times and Associated Press, or check out our update at the link below. And THANK YOU to everyone who helped make this happen!
LEARN MORE

 
A fisher being released. These fishers were captured in central British Columbia where their population remains healthy. Photo: Paul Bannick
A fisher being released. These fishers were captured in central British Columbia where their population remains healthy.
Photo: Paul Bannick

Support Fishers with a Year-end Gift

The return of fishers to Washington didn't happen by accident. Our staff worked tirelessly for over a decade to study, fund and implement this historic wildlife reintroduction effort on the Olympic Peninsula and in the Cascades.

But it wouldn't have been possible without our members. A significant portion of our funds for fisher restoration came from memberships and donations.

As 2016 comes to a close, please consider making a year-end gift for fishers and other Northwest wildlife. We'll use it to create a healthier, wilder future for the people and animals of our region.
SUPPORT OUR WORK

 
A rancher and range rider round up cattle in the Teanaway Valley. Photo: Laura Owens
A rancher and range rider round up cattle in the Teanaway Valley.
Photo: Laura Owens

Range Rider Update and Bloomberg Article

Now in its sixth year, our Range Rider Pilot Project is helping reduce conflicts with wolves. At the same time, it's increasing human tolerance for their return.

This year we worked with seven ranchers in the territory of five wolf packs. In total, these range riders patrolled over 280,000 acres on public land grazing allotments. Learn more about our range riders at the link below.

In related news, Bloomberg recently published an in-depth feature on how ranchers and conservationists are working together in Washington. They called it "a real-life fable with a moral that might just solve America."
LEARN MORE

 
Microsoft employees braved the rain to restore habitat near I-90 wildlife crossings. Photo: Paul Bannick
Microsoft employees braved the rain to restore habitat near I-90 wildlife crossings.
Photo: Paul Bannick

Restoring Habitat Near I-90 Wildlife Crossings

2016 marked the fifth year of our efforts to restore wildlife habitat near Gold Creek on Snoqualmie Pass. Because of its location along a key wildlife corridor and proximity to wildlife crossings, this area is important for animals from elk to otters.

This year we teamed up with volunteers and partners including New Belgium Brewing, Microsoft, Gravity Payments, and the Snoqualmie Tribe and The Tulalip Tribes to restore important habitat near I-90 wildlife crossings. Thanks to their help, we put nearly 2,000 native plants in the ground!
READ MORE

 
A marbled murrelet, a rare seabird that needs healthy old forests to survive. Photo: Bowers/Audubon
A marbled murrelet, a rare seabird that needs healthy old forests to survive.
Photo: Bowers/Audubon

Forestry Plan Leaves Murrelets Behind

A plan to protect marbled murrelets proposed this month by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) falls short, failing to adequately conserve the old coastal forests these seabirds need to survive.

"We have a responsibility to restore old-growth forests and help marbled murrelet populations recover," said Dave Werntz, our Science and Conservation Director. "We can ensure jobs and wildlife over the long run if we manage our state forests sustainably."
LEARN MORE

 
A majestic caribou bull. As few as 12 mountain caribou remain in the only herd in the continental U.S. Photo: USFWS
A majestic caribou bull. As few as 12 mountain caribou remain in the only herd in the continental U.S.
Photo: USFWS

Caribou Still Endangered in Washington

The world's southernmost caribou and the only remaining caribou in the lower 48 states, the South Selkirks Mountain Caribou Herd is a disappearing treasure of our natural heritage. Today, only a dozen caribou remain in this transboundary area of northeast Washington, northern Idaho and southern British Columbia.

As one step in the conservation of this iconic species, the state recently updated its Draft Periodic Status Review for caribou. At the core of this update is the recommendation that caribou remain classified as a state endangered species in Washington. We strongly support this recommendation, and our staff continue to work on behalf of caribou in Washington and southern B.C.
LEARN MORE

 
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