Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection E-Newsletter

November 2018

Save LWCFWildlife FundingMurrelet HabitatGrizzly BlogFirst FoodsHabitat Restoration

Mount Baker towers over the San Juan Islands, where the Land and Water Conservation Fund has improved public access and protected important habitat for fish and wildlife. Photo: Chase Gunnell

Mount Baker towers over the San Juan Islands, where the Land and Water Conservation Fund has improved public access and protected important habitat for fish and wildlife.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

It's time for Congress to act on the Land and Water Conservation Fund

As a new Congress convenes in the other Washington, we're calling on elected leaders to pass bipartisan legislation that reauthorizes and fully funds the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), America's most effective outdoor access program.

Our Executive Director Mitch Friedman recently ran an op-ed in The Seattle Times, and a new poll shows 73 percent of Washington voters support the LWCF.

It's time for Congress to move past the partisan divide and reauthorize LWCF, benefitting our Northwest natural heritage and the millions of people who enjoy it, now and into the future.
READ MITCH'S OP-ED

 
WDFW must have proper funding to support the stewardship of threatened species like Canada lynx, as well as more common animals like elk and deer. Photo: Patrick Reeves
WDFW must have funding to support threatened species like lynx, as well as more common animals like elk and deer.
Photo: Patrick Reeves

Call on Governor Inslee to fund wildlife and biodiversity

Washington has some of America’s most diverse fish and wildlife—from orcas and salmon to grizzly bears and fishers. But the Evergreen State hasn’t been adequately funding its Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Whether one is a wildlife watcher or a hunter, a hiker or an angler, or all of the above, the natural heritage this state agency works to sustain is vital to who we are as Washingtonians. We must give it the resources that enable it to succeed, perpetually.

Read more about the funding situation facing WDFW in this blog. Then take action by contacting Governor Inslee at the link below!
TAKE ACTION

 
Marbled murrelets are endangered in Washington state, and depend on old-growth forests for their survival. Photo: Rick Bowers/Audubon
Marbled murrelets are endangered in Washington state, and depend on old-growth forests for their survival.
Photo: Rick Bowers/Audubon

There's still time to speak up for murrelets

Murrelet populations in Washington have dropped 44 percent in the last 15 years and are now considered endangered. But it's not too late to turn things around.

The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) are preparing a Long-Term Conservation Strategy for the Marbled Murrelet.

Through 12/6, YOU can submit public comments supporting a plan that protects both these birds and rural communities. Use our simple form at the link below!
TAKE ACTION

 
Grizzly bear in British Columbia's Coast Range. Photo: David Rasmus
Grizzly bear in British Columbia's Coast Range.
Photo: David Rasmus

Biologist supports North Cascades grizzly bear restoration

In response to a local op-ed mischarecterizing the public process planning for grizzly bear restoration, Bob Everitt, a wildlife biologist and former WDFW Regional Director for Northern Puget Sound, wrote a piece for us explaining how the process works, and why returning these iconic animals to the backcountry of the North Cascades is so important. 
READ MORE

 
Amelia Marchand shares her hope for a resilient future in Cascadia at the 2018 WildLinks Conference. Photo: Heather Hutchison
CNW board member Amelia Marchand shares her hope for a resilient future at the 2018 WildLinks Conference.
Photo: Heather Hutchison

Expanding the dialogue at WildLinks

Last month, Conservation Northwest and the Cascadia Partner Forum brought together more than 60 participants in Leavenworth for our annual WildLinks Conference. WildLinks fosters a network of natural resource practitioners in Washington and B.C. to strengthen the adaptability of species, the landscapes they inhabit, and the human and wildlife communities we cherish.

First Nations and Indigenous peoples are vital partners for our work. This year, WildLinks priorities expanded to include fire and First and Traditional Foods. 

We are increasingly asking how our work supports Indigenous priorities, where our interests overlap as well as how we can support the leadership of indigenous people for healthy wildlands, wildlife and communities.
KEEP READING

 
The Columbia River Breaks viewed from the Quilomene Wildlife Area, important winter habitat for elk, mule deer and other species. Photo: Chase Gunnell
The Columbia River Breaks viewed from the Quilomene Wildlife Area, important winter habitat for elk, mule deer and other species.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

Restoring forests, habitat and public lands

You may have noticed we've been busy on a number of restoration projects this fall, and we've got a few more to report on thanks to our dedicated staff and volunteers!

Read about our work to restore forests and meadows in the Greenwater area of the Central Cascades, or learn about efforts to remove illegally-created motorized trails and protect habitat for lynx and other species at Coxit Mountain near the Loomis State Forest.

We're also working to improve public access and protect sage-steppe habitat through signage improvements in the Quilomene Wildlife Area near Ellensburg. Read on at the link below!
READ MORE

 
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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
communications@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
206.675.9747

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1829 10th Ave W
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