Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection

May 2017

Blanchard Mountain · Bear Policy · Fisher Report · New Video · Coast to Cascades · National Monuments

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Sunlight through the trees at Blanchard State Forest. Photo: Save Blanchard Mountain Facebook page

Senate funding needed to save Blanchard

We had mixed news this month for Blanchard State Forest, home to popular Oyster Dome and other prized trails and habitat near Bellingham. The state House has passed a capital budget bill that includes funding to save the Blanchard core from logging through an existing program called Trust Land Transfer.

Now it's up to the Senate to support this funding as well. WE NEED YOU to respectfully urge state leaders to permanently protect the core of Blanchard from logging!

Please take action here, or learn more at the link below. We've updated our suggested letter to include the latest information and to target both local legislators and state budget leaders, so please take action again even if you've already done so.
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A black bear in Washington. Black bears can be black, brown, blonde, cinnamon or even white. Photo: David Heflick

Concern regarding Bear Timber Depredation Management Program

KING 5 News recently released an investigation into a loophole in Washington's ban on hound hunting for black bears, approved by statewide vote in 1996 as I-655.

We're concerned by what we've learned so far, and believe it's important that the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and other parties are transparent regarding how relevant policies are being implemented.

It's important that policies to reduce black bear damage to commercial timber be conducted in accordance with the language and intent of I-655, a measure we were directly involved in the passage of. We will be looking into this matter in coordination with other conservation organizations, biologists and policy experts, and will provide more information as it becomes available.
FULL STATEMENT

 
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A fisher darts into the snowy forests of Mount Rainier National Park. Photo: Kevin Bacher/Mount Rainier National Park

South Cascades fisher reintroductions wrap-up

This past winter, 46 fishers dashed off into the wintery forests of Washington's South Cascades. Compare that to two winters ago when 23 fishers were set free in the same area, and the evidence is clear: the recent season of fisher releases – part of our multi-year reintroduction project with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Park Service, and other partners – was the most successful yet.

Now, this collaborative wildlife restoration project will shift to the North Cascades in the year ahead.
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Screenshot from our new short video Protecting, Connecting and Restoring.

VIDEO: Protecting, Connecting and Restoring

Thanks to the support of our members, we're restoring fishers to Washington. But keeping the Northwest wild is about so much more than just one species. Learn about our work to protect, connect and restore Northwest wildlife and wildlands in our new video at the link below!

Our M.O. is simple: connect the big landscapes, protect the most vulnerable wildlife, and conserve our region's natural heritage for future generations. But we can't do it without your support.
WATCH VIDEO

 
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Grizzly bear mother and cub.
Photo: Steve Ogle

Grizzly bear restoration transcends borders

Grizzly bears don't recognize international boundaries, and the wilderness, habitat and wildlife of British Columbia is vital for the long term success of animals in Washington state. That's why Conservation Northwest is an international organization working on both sides of the border.

Since 2013, we've led the Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative, an effort to stem the ongoing loss of grizzly bear range and promote grizzly bear recovery in southwest British Columbia and northwest Washington state. Check out some of our most recent accomplishments from working with BC-based organizations and First Nations in the article below.
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Washington's Hanford Reach National Monument, home to shrub-steppe wildlife and vital spawning grounds for wild Chinook salmon. Photo: USFWS

National monuments under threat, including Hanford Reach

The Trump Administration recently ordered a "review" of more than two dozen national monuments across the American West. In a new Medium article, our Communications Director lays out what makes our monuments unique and important, and why the President is seriously underestimating the American people's love for these special public lands.

Want to take action for America's national monuments? You can submit a comment through our partners at the National Wildlife Federation. We'll also be sharing suggested comments specifically for Hanford Reach before the comment period ends on July 10.
OUR MONUMENTS

 
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1208 Bay Street #201, Bellingham, WA 98225
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