Conservation Connection - December 2015 Click to view this email in a browser

December 2015

In this issue:

• Your support
• Fishers return
• Forest roads
• Stevens Pass wolf
• Staff changes
• IRA giving


 
Please consider making a year-end gift today.

Please consider making a year-end gift today.




Will you support our work in 2016?
Ancient trees frame soaring glacier-capped peaks. Trout and salmon swim in clean waters, and native predators like lynx, wolves and bears roam the Northwest landscape. These are the lands and wildlife that you connect, protect and restore when you support Conservation Northwest.

Please consider making a year-end gift to support our work in 2016.

As fresh snow falls softly in the Cascades and 2015 comes to a close, we reflect upon all that you have helped us accomplish. Visit our blog to read about some of our many achievements this year.

We're grateful for your commitment, which enables us to preserve and protect the places we love. But your support is still needed to ensure a healthy, wild Northwest. Your gift today will make all the difference for wildlife and the wild places you cherish. Thank you for giving generously so we may continue to be your voice for the wild in 2016!

 
A furry and fleet-footed holiday gift for a wilder Northwest! Photo: Paul Bannick

A furry and fleet-footed holiday gift for a wilder Northwest!
Photo: Paul Bannick



Fishers return to Washington's Cascades
On December 23rd, four more fishers leapt from crates into the snowy forests of Washington's south Cascades. Transplants from central British Columbia, the fishers are part of a collaborative project led by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Park Service and Conservation Northwest that is reintroducing these native carnivores back into their historic range in the Cascade Mountains. Eleven fishers were released during the month of December.

Check out our fisher reintroduction video or our website News Update to learn more about this historic effort.

Up to 80 fishers will be reintroduced into Washington's south Cascades in and around Mount Rainier National Park, followed by another 80 in the north Cascades in and around North Cascades National Park. This project follows our successful effort to restore fishers to Washington's Olympic Peninsula. Thank you to all our members, supporters and donors who helped reintroduction this possible!

 


A washed out bridge and forest road in the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Photo: MBSNF Sustainable Roads Cadre

A washed out bridge and forest road in the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.
Photo: MBSNF Sustainable Roads Cadre



Towards sustainable forest roads
Earlier this month, the U.S. Forest Service released travel analysis reports that assess existing road systems and identify opportunities to achieve a more sustainable system of roads for each national forest in the Pacific Northwest.

The reports show that there are over 90,000 miles of U.S. Forest Service roads in Washington and Oregon. However, the agency only has 15 percent of the funding needed to maintain this extensive road network. And across our region, unmaintained and excessive forest roads are causing severe harm to threatened fish and wildlife.

Guided by public input, access requirements and data on ecological impacts, the Forest Service must considerably reduce its road network to a size that's ecologically and economically sustainable.

 


A collared gray wolf photographed in the Chiwaukum Mountains between Stevens Pass and Leavenworth. Photo: CWMP / CNW

A collared gray wolf photographed in the Chiwaukum Mountains between Stevens Pass and Leavenworth.
Photo: CWMP / CNW



Another wolf photographed near Stevens Pass
We're always excited to see which animals cross paths with our Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project cameras. And while we often catch black bears, bobcats, deer and coyotes, sometimes we get extra lucky and glimpse something a little rarer.

In this year's batch of photos, a collared wolf made a starring appearance at a camera site in the Chiwaukum Mountains between Stevens Pass and Leavenworth in late November! This same camera site also took amazing photos of a rare wolverine and another wolf in early 2015.

Capturing photos of a second wolf in this area was an exciting discovery for our citizen-science monitoring project. However, we don't believe a new pack is establishing territory in the Stevens Pass area at this time. Still, it's only a matter of time before Washington's wolves establish a pack on the west side of the Cascades.

 


The Conservation Northwest staff at our 2015 retreat in the Methow Valley. Photo: Paul Bannick.

The Conservation Northwest staff at our 2015 retreat in the Methow Valley.
Photo: Paul Bannick



More changes on our team
We've had a few more staff changes this fall, and want to send our best wishes to Alison Huyett, our former Conservation Associate, and Stephanie Pietromonaco, who worked as our Development Manager and Seattle Office Manager (and managed our last two auctions) as they move on from their time at Conservation Northwest.

We thank them for the excellent work they did for Conservation Northwest and wish them all the best in their new positions!

Although saying 'goodbye' is hard, the opportunity for new 'hellos' is never far behind. We've had the fortune to bring on two great new staffers and a contractor. We are excited to welcome Aleah Jaeger, Jenni Minier, and Nina Gruber to the Conservation Northwest team. Learn more about our new staffers in this blog post!

 


North-central Washington's Tunk Valley, where we're working with donors and private landowners to conserve ranchlands. Photo: Justin Haug

North-central Washington's Tunk Valley, where we're working with donors and private landowners to conserve ranchlands.
Photo: Justin Haug



New IRA option for charitable giving
The U.S. Congress and the Obama administration have permanently authorized tax deductions for charitable gifts from an Individual Retirement Account (IRA). Charitable giving from IRAs adds to the suite of options for supporting nonprofits like Conservation Northwest.

Our work to connect, protect and restore wildlands and wildlife in the Pacific Northwest is made possible by the generosity of people like you, and we are pleased that you will continue to be able to leverage your philanthropic dollars through this deduction.

Learn more in our blog post or by contacting your tax adviser.

 



Visit our newsletters page for a paper or NEW FLIPBOOK version of our latest newsletter, "Reaching Milestones: Making connections for wildlife".

Thank you for considering a donation to support our work.


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Conservation Northwest
1208 Bay Street #201, Bellingham, WA 98225
info@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
800.878.9950

 




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