Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection

June 2017

Our Seattle HQ · Caribou Film · Hanford Monument · Wildlife Monitoring · Range Riders · Wolf News

Our Seattle headquarters is in the Queen Anne neighborhood, not far from views like this! Photo: Aiisha5

Our Seattle headquarters is in the Queen Anne neighborhood, not far from views like this! Photo: Aiisha5

We've moved our headquarters to Seattle

After being based out of Bellingham for more than 25 years, this spring we officially moved the Conservation Northwest headquarters to our Seattle office.

Please be sure to send all mail to our Seattle address! For more information, or to schedule a Seattle visit, please contact Maureen, our Office Manager and Development Associate.

Though our Bellingham roots remain dear to us, and we'll still operate an office on Bay Street, our Seattle location offers closer connections with elected leaders, media, and partner organizations and agencies. It's also a prime base of operations for staff heading out to work on conservation programs in the I-90 Corridor, Central Cascades, Columbia Basin, and beyond.
MORE ON OUR STAFF

 
Mountain caribou cows in central British Columbia. Unique among ungulates, both caribou bulls and cows have antlers. Photo: David Moskowitz
Mountain caribou cows in central British Columbia. Unique among ungulates, both caribou bulls and cows have antlers.
Photo: David Moskowitz

Last Stand: The Vanishing Caribou Rainforest

Did you know Washington is home to the world's southernmost caribou? Fewer than a dozen mountain caribou remain in the South Selkirks herd which roams northeast Washington, northern Idaho and southern British Columbia.

But it's not too late. And a new film that we're proud to support aims to bring attention to their plight, and efforts to save them.

Please join us for the premiere of Last Stand: The Vanishing Caribou Rainforest TOMORROW, June 28 at the Mountaineers Program Center in Seattle! Tickets are only $12 online, doors open at 7:00 pm.
READ MORE

 
The Hanford Reach, last free-flowing stretch of the lower Columbia River and home to Chinook salmon, steelhead, elk, mule deer and important natural and cultural heritage. Photo: USFWS
The Hanford Reach, last free-flowing stretch of the lower Columbia River and home to Chinook salmon, steelhead, elk, mule deer and important natural and cultural heritage.
Photo: USFWS

Comments in support of Hanford Reach

In late April, the Trump Administration announced an unprecedented "review" of national monuments, a blatant move to undermine the Antiquities Act and the protections it provides our public lands. We've blogged about the importance of monuments for conservation and recreation, and why attempts to shrink or rescind them will face stiff legal and social opposition.

We've also been working closely with partner organizations, elected leaders including Senators Cantwell and Murray, and local groups to ensure Washington's Hanford Reach National Monument isn't threatened. As part of that effort, we're submitting official comments on behalf of our more than 4,000 members in support of continued monument protections at Hanford Reach.

And don't forget: through July 10 YOU can use your voice to stand up for national monuments! Go to www.regulations.gov, or use the comment form below from our partners at the National Wildlife Federation.
TAKE ACTION

 
A herd of elk in the south Cascades. Our remote cameras in this area are looking for wolves, and that means going where the elk are! Photo: CWMP
A herd of elk in the south Cascades. Our remote cameras in this area are looking for wolves, and that means going where the elk are! Photo: CWMP

Wildlife monitoring season begins

This summer our Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project will have 23 survey areas, each consisting of multiple remote camera sites, some of which are maintained year-round. 

These sites harness the power of volunteer hikers and backpackers to document Northwest wildlife through trail cameras, animal tracking, and other methods!

Survey areas focus on monitoring different target species, including nine wolverine sites, three I-90 area wildlife movement sites, one grizzly bear site in the North Cascades; seven gray wolf sites south of I-90, and three Canada lynx sites in northeast Washington.
LEARN MORE

 
Two training participants look on as ranchers from Montana demonstrate
Training participants look on as ranchers from Montana demonstrate "low-stress" ways to improve herd management, range conditions, and coexistence with carnivores. Photo: Alaina Kowitz

Perspectives on range riders and ranching

At the end of May, our staffers joined a group of ranchers from Montana and northeast Washington for a training in Republic to discuss low-stress livestock handling methods.

The goal? To calmly move cattle through stressful situations, improving range conditions and making herds more resilient against wildlife conflicts.

Projects such as this are part of our efforts to build collaboration between conservationists and ranchers, promoting coexistence with wolves alongside thriving local communities.
LEARN MORE

 
A black wolf on a forest road in northeast Washington. Washington now has a minimum of 115 known wolves in 20 confirmed packs including at least 10 breeding pairs. Photo: WDFW
A black wolf on a forest road in northeast Washington. Washington has a minimum of 115 confirmed wolves in 20 confirmed packs including at least 10 breeding pairs.
Photo: WDFW

Revised protocol and wolves in Skagit County

This month brought the exciting news that a wolf was confirmed by state and federal biologists in eastern Skagit County! As our wolf population continues to expand, it will be important for wildlife constituents from all sides to work together to promote coexistence.

An important metric in that process was also recently revealed: the number of Washington ranchers joining cooperative agreements to reduce wolf conflicts or who are otherwise covered by contract range riders has increased from 20 in 2013 to 90 in 2017!

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife also released a revised Wolf-Livestock Interaction Protocol this month, the product of coordination between biologists, conservationists, livestock producers, hunters, and other stakeholders on and off the Wolf Advisory Group.

We strongly believe that these updated policies reflect a balanced approach to wolf conservation and management that supports long-term wolf recovery while also meeting the needs of local communities and small businesses operating in wolf country.
READ MORE

 
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Keeping the Northwest Wild

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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
communications@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
206.675.9747

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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W
Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98119
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