Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection

October 2016

Member Drive · Wolf Op-Ed · Fisher Photos · Grizzly Event · Prescribed Fire · Camera Rescue

Mount Shuksan in the North Cascades, one of the important  ecosystems we work to connect, protect and restore. Photo Ron Thomas

Mount Shuksan in the North Cascades, one of the important ecosystems we work to connect, protect and restore.
Photo: Ron Thomas

Protect, Connect and Restore

Sparkling glaciers atop rugged mountains. Majestic old-growth forests teeming with life. Fishers, wolves and other wildlife returned. This is what Conservation Northwest works for.

We protect, connect and restore wildlife and wildlands. For nearly 30 years we've won hard-fought protections for the places that make the Pacific Northwest so special. And it's all possible due to the generosity of supporters like you.

Become a member or renew your membership for only $25 TODAY 10/31 and be entered to win an Outdoor Research Diode Hooded (or similar) jacket!
JOIN US

 
A wolf near Sherman Pass in Ferry County, Washington. Photo: CNW Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project
A black wolf near Sherman Pass in Ferry County, Washington.
Photo: CNW Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project

Seattle Times Op-Ed on Profanity Peak Pack

There has been much anguish and grief over the tragic events in northeast Washington this summer involving the Profanity Peak Wolf Pack.

However, when it comes to wolf recovery and coexistence, Washington has much to be hopeful about. Read more in our Executive Director's Op-Ed in Sunday's Seattle Times.

In the interest of reducing the disagreement and tension around this issue that are based in confusion, we also recently published an update fact-checking some of the claims around the Profanity Peak Wolf Pack.
LEARN MORE

 
A fisher photographed in Washington's South Cascades. Researchers believe this is reintroduced female F013, Gail. Photo: Mitchell Parsons, UW Graduate Student
A fisher photographed in Washington's South Cascades. Researchers believe this is reintroduced female F013, Gail.
Photo: Mitchell Parsons, UW Graduate Student

Reintroduced fishers photographed in the Cascades

During the fall and winter of 2015-16, we partnered with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the National Park Service in a historic effort to reintroduce fishers to Washington's Cascade Mountains.

Now, these amazing members of the weasel family are showing up on remote camera stations established by scientists studying their recovery in our state!

The next phase of our collaborative fisher reintroduction project will kick off later this fall in and around Mount Rainier National Park.
LEARN MORE

 
A young attendee learns about grizzly bears. Photo by Anna Marie Jensen
A young attendee learns about grizzly bears.
Photo: Anna Marie Jensen

Packed house for Why Grizzly Bears? with Chris Morgan!

Thank you to everyone who joined us for a fantastic grizzly bear event at the Mountaineers in Seattle this month. Together we completely filled the room with over 400 people in attendance!

And a special THANK YOU to our raffle sponsors Patagonia, Filson, Cascade Endurance, Second Ascent, Outdoor Research, Woodland Park Zoo, and Chris Morgan Wildlife!

Click the link below to view event photos. Weren't able to attend but want to learn more and show your support? Visit www.northcascadesgrizzly.org to become a Friend of the North Cascades Grizzly Bear!
PHOTOS FROM EVENT

 
A prescribed burn on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in June 2016. This controlled fire helps improve forest health, habitat and community safety. Photo: OWNF
A prescribed burn on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in June 2016. Controlled fire helps improve forest health, habitat and community safety.
Photo: OWNF

Smoke is in the air this fall, and it's helping our forests

Prescribed burning is underway on national and state forest lands in Washington this fall, and we're seeing more progress than usual after years of effort to get more restorative fire back on these landscapes.

Prescribed fire is an efficient way to minimize the damage of natural wildfires and boost forest health. Under a state pilot project that we're supporting, up to 8,300 acres of public forest land in Eastern Washington is being intentionally burned this fall.
LEARN MORE

 
Our volunteer and former intern Erin removes a trail camera that was deployed to photograph wolverines. Photo: Alaina Kowitz
Our volunteer and former intern Erin removes a trail camera that was deployed to photograph wolverines.
Photo: Alaina Kowitz

In search of a wildlife camera

The life of a wildlife monitoring camera is a difficult one. It's fraught with uncertainty and danger, bad weather and thieves, user error and malfunctions. It's not an easy life to be carted out into the woods, tied to a tree, and left for months on end. Anything could happen out there.

Something did happen out there, there being near Mount Baker in the North Cascades. A camera deployed for wolverines was missing and winter is coming. Some of the women of Conservation Northwest set out determined to find it.
READ MORE

 
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Conservation Northwest
1208 Bay Street #201, Bellingham, WA 98225
communications@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
800.878.9950

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