Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection E-Newsletter

April 2018

Annual AuctionGrizzly Op-EdWolf UpdatesSagelands ProgramRecovering Wildlife ActCaribou Survey

Our Executive Director Mitch Friedman speaking at our Hope for a Wild Future Auction & Dinner.

Our Executive Director Mitch Friedman speaking at our Hope for a Wild Future Auction & Dinner.

THANK YOU to everyone who attended our auction

This year's Hope for a Wild Future auction and dinner was our biggest ever, with more than $400,000 raised to support our work keeping the Northwest wild. THANK YOU!

If you couldn't make it to our biggest event of the year, you can still show your support by joining or renewing your membership through an online gift of $35 or more.

For some inspiration, read Mitch's speech on our work to connect and restore habitat for mountain caribou, pygmy rabbits, grizzly bears and more, or check out our auction video Connecting the Wild Northwest.
AUCTION VIDEO

 
A grizzly bear in a mountain meadow, a sight that may soon again be a possibility in the North Cascades. Photo: Jason Verschoor
A grizzly bear in a mountain meadow, a sight that may soon again be a possibility in the North Cascades.
Photo: Jason Verschoor

Time for action on North Cascades grizzly bears

This month was full of bear news following March's surprise endorsement of North Cascades grizzly restoration by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.

Our International Programs Director Joe Scott penned an op-ed for The Seattle Times, and Crosscut published an in-depth feature on the issue.

Last year, more than 120,000 people submitted comments supporting a plan to carefully restore 25 grizzly bears to the North Cascades over 10 years. It's an approach guided by science and community input that's been successful in places like northwest Montana. Now, it's time to act.
GRIZZLY OP-Ed

 
A gray wolf travels on a forest road in Washington. Photo: WDFW
A gray wolf travels on a forest road in Washington.
Photo: WDFW

Wolf updates from Olympia

The state legislative session wrapped up in Olympia last month, and included in the budget were three items related to Washington's wolves.

Our Policy Director Paula Swedeen, Ph.D., was busy during the legislative session advocating for resources to continue supporting ranchers in their use of proactive deterrence measures and for funds to study the presence of wolves in the Cascade Mountains.

Paula also informed proposals that would consider whether to relocate wolves from northeast Washington into other state-designated Wolf Recovery Zones.
READ MORE

 
Mule deer, a key species in Eastern Washington's Sagelands heavily affected by highways and habitat fragmentation. Photo: Technotr
Mule deer, a key species in Eastern Washington's Sagelands heavily affected by highways and habitat fragmentation.
Photo: Technotr

Connecting and restoring Washington's Sagelands

Last year, we began our Sagelands Heritage Program, an ambitious effort to restore and connect habitat in Central Washington and southern British Columbia for the good of both wildlife and people.

The northernmost extent of a "Sagebrush Sea" that extends from the eastern front of the Rocky Mountains to the Inland Northwest, our region's arid sage steppe is often overlooked compared to the rugged splendor of mountain ranges like the Cascades. But spend some time here and you'll find diverse wildlife, vibrant local communities, important agriculture and ranching, and endless opportunities for outdoor recreation.
READ MORE

 
A majestic mountain caribou bull in British Columbia. Photo: David Moskowitz
A majestic mountain caribou bull in British Columbia.
Photo: David Moskowitz

Three caribou remaining in South Selkirks herd

This month, biologists from northeast Washington's Kalispel Tribe, along with other provincial and federal wildlife managers, shared the tragic news that only three mountain caribou were counted during a survey this spring in the South Selkirk Mountains of southern British Columbia, northeast Washington and northern Idaho.

"This is a profoundly sad, but inevitable day for caribou," said Joe Scott, our International Programs Director. "One could predict it. The science is clear and the map of mountain caribou herds and their habitat tells the story—isolated blobs like islands in a sea of human impacts."
READ MORE

 
Two male sharp-tailed grouse dancing for a female's attention. This threatened grouse species is among hundreds that the Recovering America's Wildlife Act would support. Photo: HStiver
Two male sharp-tailed grouse dancing for a female's attention. This threatened grouse species is among hundreds that the Recovering America's Wildlife Act would support.
Photo: HStiver

Recovering America's Wildlife Act would help keep Washington wild

We're working with the National Wildlife Federation and elected leaders to support HR 4647, the Recovering America's Wildlife Act (RAWA), which would provide funding our wildlife need.

Under the legislation's allocation formula, $26 million would go to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to restore key ecosystems and species.

"This is money well invested," says Paula Swedeen, Ph.D., our Policy Director. "It is vastly more efficient to conserve and restore wildlife before they decline to such low levels that they need federal protection under the Endangered Species Act."
LEARN MORE

 
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1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
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www.conservationnw.org
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1829 10th Ave W
Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98119
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