Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection E-Newsletter

May 2018

Wolverine NewsGrouse ReleasedCentral CascadesElk CrossingMethow ForestsGiveBIG Thanks

A wolverine captured on remote camera in Washington's North Cascades. Photo: Cascades Wolverine Project

A wolverine captured on remote camera in Washington's North Cascades.
Photo: Cascades Wolverine Project.

Wolverine babies in the South Cascades, event in Seattle on 5/30

May was full of exciting news for a mountain icon: the elusive wolverine!

Our partners at the Cascades Carnivore Project made headlines with photos and video of the first wolverine kits confirmed south of I-90 in modern times. Check out their amazing video!

Our Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project also documented a wolverine north of Baker Lake, one of only a few of these animals confirmed west of the Cascades Crest.

You can learn more about the wily wolverine TOMORROW evening, Wednesday, May 30th, when our partners at the Cascades Wolverine Project host a talk at Ascent Outdoors in Seattle's Ballard neighborhood about their efforts documenting wolverines and sharing information on how recreationists can report tracks and sightings. We hope to see you there!
WOLVERINE EVENT

 
A sharp-tailed grouse takes flight in the Okanogan Valley. Photo: WDFW
A sharp-tailed grouse takes flight in the Okanogan Valley.
Photo: WDFW

Grouse released as part of Working for Wildlife Initiative

Earlier this month, our staff were lucky to join and assist with the release of sharp-tailed grouse in the Tunk Valley, a key habitat corridor connecting to north-central Washington's Okanogan Valley.

Sharp-tailed grouse are listed as Threatened in Washington state, with a proposal before the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission to uplist them to Endangered. These amazing birds, known for their extravagant dancing displays to attract mates, are limited to eight isolated populations scattered across Douglas, Lincoln, and Okanogan counties.

Through the Working for Wildlife Initiative and our Sagelands Heritage Program, we're working with partners and facilitating innovative collaborations to maintain, restore and connect shrub-steppe landscapes for the good of both wildlife and people.
GROUSE RELEASE

 
The river valleys of the Central Cascades are vital corridors for wildlife moving between the Alpine Lakes Wilderness and Mount Rainier. Photo: Chase Gunnell
The river valleys of the Central Cascades are vital corridors for wildlife movement between the Alpine Lakes Wilderness and Mount Rainier.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

Comment on management of forests between I-90 and Mount Rainier

Our new Central Cascades Watersheds Restoration program works to restore habitat on public lands north and south of I-90 that are vital to wildlife movement between Mount Rainier National Park and the Alpine Lakes Wilderness.

Under this effort, we're engaging with the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest on plans for forest management in the Green and White river watersheds around Highway 410.

We need your voice to support habitat restoration and sustainable recreation on these public forest lands. Take action using the link below before June 1st!
TAKE ACTION

 
Elk moving under I-90 on May 9 using the Hyak Wildlife Undercrossing. Photo: WSDOT
Elk moving under I-90 on May 9 using the Hyak Wildlife Undercrossing
Photo: WSDOT

Elk using I-90 wildlife crossings this spring

On May 9, our partners at WSDOT captured some awesome remote camera footage of elk using the Hyak Wildlife Undercrossing just east of Snoqualmie Pass. Check it out on our I-90 Wildlife Watch Facebook page!

Have YOU seen elk or other wildlife alive or dead along I-90 between North Bend and Easton? Report sightings at: i90wildlifewatch.org/report-a-sighting.

Info from motorists helps inform wildlife crossings and other conservation efforts in this important corridor.
I-90 WILDLIFE WATCH

 
Conservation Associate George Wooten leading a native plant survey in Eastern Washington. Photo: Chase Gunnell
Conservation Associate George Wooten leading a native plant survey in Eastern Washington.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

Restoring forests, waters, and fire on the Okanogan-Wenatchee

In the Methow Valley, a forest project is moving ahead with conservation guidelines, benefits for both forest health and local economies, and our support thanks to common-ground reached through collaboration.

Living and working out of the town of Twisp, George Wooten serves as our Forest Field Program representative on the east side of the North Cascades, working with the Forest Service and other stakeholders to restore fish and wildlife habitat.

Learn more about George's work on the Mission Restoration Project and other efforts at the link below!
RESTORING FORESTS

 
Your support allows us to protect, connect and restore wildlands and wildlife, from the Washington Coast to the Columbia Highlands and the British Columbia Rockies. Photo: Eric Zamora
Your support allows us to protect, connect and restore wildlands and wildlife, from the Washington Coast to the Columbia Highlands and British Columbia Rockies.
Photo: Eric Zamora

Thank you to everyone who gave BIG!

THANK YOU to the 145 people who supported our work to keep the Northwest wild through the Seattle's Foundation's GiveBIG event!

With your support, we raised more than $16,000 for our programs conserving old-growth forests, sagelands, caribou, fishers, grizzly bears, and other native wildlife, ensuring a wild future for both people and animals across our region.

We recognize that for long-term progress, conservation must go hand-in-hand with healthy communities. We're restoring wildlife, forests and wild places by working with diverse stakeholders. Through dialogue, we find common ground and collaborative solutions for challenging issues including wilderness conservation, endangered species recovery, and sustainable natural resource use across our region. Your support makes this work possible!
OUR WORK

 
Donate to help support our work

Keeping the Northwest Wild

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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
communications@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
206.675.9747

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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W
Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98119
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