Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection

August 2017

I-90 Wildlife Watch · Lynx Project · Wolf News · Hunting Regulations · Atlantic Salmon · National Monuments

Two deer walking under I-90, Gold Creek underpass, I-90 east of Snoqualmie Pass. Photo credit: WSDOT

Two deer walking in the Gold Creek wildlife crossing under I-90 just east of Snoqualmie Pass near Hyak.
Photo: WSDOT

Help us make Interstate 90 safer for wildlife

We’re excited to announce the re-launch of the I-90 Wildlife Watch project, which aims to receive feedback on wildlife from motorists traveling over Snoqualmie Pass!

We're inviting people to report wildlife, dead or alive, that they see between North Bend and Easton using the newly updated I-90 Wildlife Watch website. This data helps us and our agency partners better understand where animals are moving and trying to cross the interstate.

I-90 Wildlife Watch also seeks to share photos of wildlife using the habitat in and around these crossings. Check out the awesome animal photos and informative blogs on the website, evidence that the crossings are saving animals' lives and connecting important habitat, all while improving safety on the interstate.
LEARN MORE

 
A Canada lynx being collared for release. Photo: Okanagan Nation Alliance
A Canada lynx being collared for release.
Photo: Okanagan Nation Alliance

Working with First Nations to reduce lynx mortality

In the Kettle River Mountain Range of southern British Columbia and northeast Washington, the third season of a collaborative project is well underway to decrease Canada lynx mortality, better understand their movements, and expand the involvement of First Nations, British Columbia trappers, and the provincial government in lynx conservation.

Instead of trapping these rare felines for their fur, First Nations trappers in B.C. have installed live traps to capture lynx to be collared and released, reducing mortality while also increasing our understanding of how lynx travel across the landscape.
READ MORE

 
A gray wolf photographed in May near Marblemount in Skagit County. Photo: Marvin Kempf
A gray wolf photographed in May near Marblemount in Skagit County.
Photo: Marvin Kempf

Wolf roams Skagit County, Sherman Pack in conflict

The gray wolf documented in eastern Skagit County this spring has been collared by the state and continues to roam territory near Marblemount.

We recently talked with the Skagit County Herald about this discovery, and how groups can work together to promote coexistence.

"Wolves are inspiring and iconic animals native to the Pacific Northwest. They belong here, and we’re glad to see them back."

In other wolf news, last Friday, the Department of Fish and Wildlife announced it is pursuing incremental lethal removal of at least one wolf from the Sherman Pack in response to repeated depredations on livestock despite deterrence measures in place.

Earlier this month, we funded three additional range riders working in this pack's territory in hopes of helping stem the conflict there. That is in addition to the up to five contract range riders previously deployed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the ranchers in that area this year.

We are saddened that these deterrence measures did not prevent persistent wolf-livestock conflicts in this area, and we are concerned by the fact that this latest lethal removal is in response to depredations on cattle operated by the same rancher as previous years’ conflicts.
READ MORE

 
An ID guide to help people differentiate black and grizzly bears. Photo: WDFW
An ID guide to help people differentiate black and grizzly bears.
Photo: WDFW

Weigh-in on Washington's hunting regulations

The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife is looking for initial public input on future hunting seasons and regulations, including increased protections for endangered species. Hunting is an important way many Washingtonians engage with our state’s rich wildlife heritage, and revenue from license sales and taxes on hunting and fishing equipment is a major source of funding for conservation.

Hunters and other interested members of the public can weigh in through August 31 by taking several surveys available at the link below. Of particular note are a proposal to require a bear identification test for those purchasing black bear hunting tags in order to reduce the potential for accidental killings of federally protected grizzly bears, and a proposal to restrict night hunting of bobcats in areas where Canada lynx are present to reduce accidental lynx mortality.
TAKE ACTION

 
The site of the Atlantic salmon net pen failure in the San Juan Islands, and one of several proposed sites for new net pens by the same company. Graphic: Our Sound Our Salmon
The site of the Atlantic salmon net pen failure in the San Juan Islands, and one of several proposed sites for new net pens by the same company.
Graphic: Our Sound Our Salmon

Atlantic salmon net pen failure highlights need to stop fish farm expansion

A Canadian company's Atlantic salmon net pens failed in the San Juan Islands this month, releasing hundreds of thousands of non-native fish into the Salish Sea. The company, Cooke Aquaculture, claimed the incident was a result of strong currents caused by the solar eclipse.

But tide charts and current data show normal water movement that weekend, and every month of 2017 had brought stronger currents to the area than those experienced on the day of the failure.

This same company is threatening the health of Puget Sound with their proposal to further transform it into an epicenter of Atlantic salmon net pen production. We cannot risk putting our Sound, our salmon, and the ecosystems that rely on them into the hands of an industry with a long history of negative environmental, social, and economic impacts - impacts that led California, Oregon, and Alaska to wisely ban Atlantic salmon net pens.

Send a message to Governor Inslee and state agencies via our partners at Our Sound, Our Salmon at the link below!
TAKE ACTION

 
Beautiful Bunchgrass Meadows on the Colville National Forest. Photo: Eric Zamora
Oregon's Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is among the important wild places that the Department of the Interior is expected to propose to revise or rescind. Photo: Friends of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Wildlife Federations Call for Protection of National Monuments

This month, we proudly joined with the National Wildlife Federation and eight other Western wildlife federation affiliate organizations in an open letter calling on Secretary Ryan Zinke to uphold the Antiquities Act and declare that all monuments will remain as they were legally designated.

The Department of the Interior recently submitted a report to the White House that included reccomendations on which monuments to protect, revise or rescind. However, the actual reccomendatirons have not yet been made available to the public.

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke did confirm that Washington's Hanford Reach National Monument would not be among those proposed for changes.

New analysis of the millions of public comments submitted indicates up to 99.2 percent of respondents opposed the executive order and its threat to these iconic public places!
READ MORE

 
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1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
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