Conservation Northwest

Conservation Northwest

The Conservation Connection E-Newsletter

December 2018

Give for Wildlife2018 AccomplishmentsFishers ReturnedWildlife BudgetSagelands ConservationUpper Wenatchee

We've made important progress for local wildlife and wildlands this year. Will you help us ring in 2019 with a gift of $35 or more? Fisher photo: Paul Bannick

We've made important progress for local wildlife and wildlands this year. Will you help us ring in 2019 with a gift of $35 or more?
Fisher photo: Paul Bannick

Support local wildlife and wildlands

At Conservation Northwest, we have a record of bringing diverse stakeholders together for innovative, community-based conservation. But there's still so much that we can achieve with your help. 

Will you make a tax-deductible donation of $35 or more to protect, connect and restore Northwest wildlands and wildlife in 2019?

Please join or renew your membership today!
JOIN OR RENEW

 
With your support, we protected old-growth forests and other wildlands, connected large landscapes and vital habitats, and restored native wildlife. Photo: Chase Gunnell
With your support, we protected old-growth forests and other wildlands, connected large landscapes and vital habitats, and restored native wildlife.
Photo: Chase Gunnell

Accomplishments in 2018

With your support, we made important progress in 2018. Here are a few highlights:

- We've long championed wildlife crossings over and under I-90, and now animals are using them! A coyote was the first to cross over the interstate, and elk, bears and others will follow in the spring.

- With our leadership, the forest around Oyster Dome and Blanchard Mountain has been permanently saved from logging.

- Collaborating with government partners, we brought fishers back to the North Cascades after a near 80-year absence.

- We restored vital habitat and cherished outdoor recreation areas from Okanogan and Ellensburg to Greenwater and Yakima.

And much more! Click the link below to read our full list of 2018 accomplishments.
ACCOMPLISHMENTS

 
A fisher released near Newhalem in North Cascades National Park in early December. Photo: Paul Bannick
A fisher released near Newhalem in North Cascades National Park in early December.
Photo: Paul Bannick

Restoring fishers and righting a wrong

December marked a momentous occasion for our more than decade-long project to return fishers to Washington: we began the third and final phase of the effort by reintroducing more than a dozen of these native animals to the North Cascades.

For the first time in nearly 80 years, fishers are now roaming the upper Skagit and Sauk river watersheds, restoring one of the last native species that went locally extinct here in the early 20th century.

Watch a video of fishers returning to the North Cascades, or read the official news release. For inspiring perspectives from our staff, check out the blog below!
FISHERS RETURN

 
Roosevelt elk and other Washington wildlife need full funding for habitat conservation and restoration. Photo: Eric Foltz.
Roosevelt elk and other Washington wildlife need full funding for habitat conservation and restoration.
Photo: Eric Foltz

Governor's budget mostly ups but one huge down for Washington's wildlife

Governor Jay Inslee released his 2019-21 budget proposal this month, and it has big implications for Washington's wildlife, outdoor heritage and quality of life.

"The Governor's budget proposal is pretty good," said Mitch Friedman, our Executive Director. "It includes $32 million to fill the existing deficit at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), plus a number of the items requested for better service. We are thankful for all this."

"However, there is one glaring area where the Governor's proposal fails terribly," said Friedman. "WDFW had requested $12.9 million to enhance fish and wildlife conservation and $4.2 million for habitat improvements. But the Governor proposed only $1.3 million of the former and zero for the latter! We're calling on state legislators to fill this gap and fully fund Washington's wildlife heritage."
READ MORE

 
Spiva Butte, and important area of sage brush and wetlands habitat in north-central Washington. Photo: Ferdi Businger
Spiva Butte, and important area of sage brush and wetlands habitat in north-central Washington
Photo: Ferdi Businger

Sagelands Heritage Program conserves critical wildlands

We collaborated with partners this year to make progress for two key areas in the northern half of our Sagelands Heritage Program: Spiva Butte in Douglas County and the proposed South Okanagan-Similkameen National Park in southern British Columbia.

These important "anchor points" help connect habitat across a large north-to-south stretch of shrub-steppe east of the Cascade Mountains that natural resource managers call the "Connected Backbone."

We're making progress on maintaining, restoring and connecting Washington's shrub-steppe landscapes for the good of both wildlife and people.
KEEP READING

 
The Chiwawa River north of Lake Wenatchee, a key watershed in a new collaborative forest restoration project we're involved in. Photo: Kelly Smith
The Chiwawa River north of Lake Wenatchee, a key watershed in a new collaborative forest restoration project we're involved in.
Photo: Kelly Smith

Promoting resilient forests through the Upper Wenatchee Restoration Pilot Project

We're part of a new collaborative effort to restore forest health near Lake Wenatchee, benefitting both people and wildlife. 

The goal of the Upper Wenatchee Restoration Pilot Project is to restore forest resiliency and watershed health on national forest lands, while reducing the risk of fire to surrounding communities.

We know healthy forests and watersheds go hand-in-hand with healthy, prosperous communities and abundant wildlife.
READ MORE

 
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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W, Suite B
Seattle, WA 98119
communications@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
206.675.9747

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Conservation Northwest
1829 10th Ave W
Suite B
Seattle, Washington 98119
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