Conservation Connection - June 2014 Click to view this email in a browser

June 2014

In this issue:

• I-90 Wildlife Crossing
• Range Riders
• Wildlife Monitoring
• Spring/Summer Newsletter
• Eyes in the Woods
• All-Terrain Vehicles


The first deer photographed using the Gold Creek crossing. Photo: WSDOT

The first deer photographed using the Gold Creek crossing.
Photo: WSDOT




HUGE I-90 Wildlife Crossing News

Near the end of May, WSDOT cameras captured footage of the very first animal using the new I-90 Gold Creek under-crossing near Snoqualmie Pass! And a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) biologist reported seeing two more deer passing under the highway the next day.

WSDOT is planning to install a second, higher quality camera at the site to monitor the project's impact on local habitat connectivity and migrating wildlife as they move safely north and south of I-90 over the summer.

This year we have six range riders working to prevent wolf-livestock conflict. Photo: Laura Owens

This year we have six range riders working to prevent wolf-livestock conflict.
Photo: Laura Owens



News from the Range

In early June, Washington ranchers began turning out their cows and calves onto summer grazing lands, including nearly 70,000 acres of U.S. Forest Service property. Some of those lands overlap with habitat home to Washington's recovering wolf population, and that's where you'll find livestock under the watchful eye of range riders co-sponsored by Conservation Northwest and WDFW.

This year we're collaborating with even more ranchers on the ground in wolf country, from the Methow and Teanaway valleys to Stevens County in northeast Washington, to send six riders out in the field working to minimize wolf and livestock conflict.

Check out our latest News Update to learn more about this summer's range riders and how a study from Washington State University might provide new information about depredation and the indirect effects of wolves on cattle.



 




Volunteers and staff place a trail cam at the site where two cougars were filmed. Photo: CWMP

Volunteers and staff place a trail cam at the site where two cougars were filmed.
Photo: CWMP



Support Citizen Wildlife Monitoring

We've hit the ground running on another exciting Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project season and we need your support! This marks our thirteenth year deploying remote cameras in the wild places of the Northwest looking for information on rare and recovering species.

In past years, our volunteer-operated wildlife cameras have captured stunning images of everything from wolf pups in the Methow and wolverines in the Chiwaukum Mountains to martens and black bears in the Teanaway. These images not only record rare animals, including Washington's returning wolves, but also document connectivity for wildlife in key habitats like the I-90 corridor in the Cascades and the Columbia Highlands.

Over the summer we'll be sharing some of the awesome wildlife footage our volunteers captured last season, starting with this pair of cougars. Stay tuned to our YouTube channel for more!



 



Our anniversary edition of Conservation Northwest Quarterly. Photo: Matthew Quaid

Our anniversary edition of Conservation Northwest Quarterly.
Photo: Matthew Quaid



25 Years of Keeping it Wild

A special 25th anniversary edition of our Conservation Quarterly newsletter should have reached your mailbox by now, packed cover-to-cover with thoughtful testimonials from supporters, forward thinking from Executive Director Mitch Friedman, a timeline of success over the past two and a half decades, and stunning wildlife photography.

Interested in becoming a member and receiving our print newsletters? Sign up online right here and you'll get our fall newsletter mailed to you as soon as it's published.

The Conservation Quarterly can also be read online here, or pick up a complimentary print copy at supporting businesses and organizations across the Northwest, from select Puget Sound REI locations to the Mazama Store.



 



Trainings help citizens reduce poaching and natural resource abuses. Photo: WDFW

Trainings help citizens reduce poaching and natural resource abuses.
Photo: WDFW



Eyes in the Woods Trainings

With help from Eyes in the Woods, the Mule Deer Foundation, Western Wildlife Outreach and WDFW, we're holding trainings in Republic on July 23rd and Colville on July 24th, and we just hosted a great event in Mazama this past weekend.

The popular Eyes in the Woods statewide program trains citizens to identify, document, and report natural resource crimes, creating a trained network dedicated to reducing poaching and resource abuses through a non-confrontational expert witness program. Learn more on our events calendar!



 



Damage from illegal off-road vehicle

Damage from illegal off-road vehicle "mudding" near Ione.
Photo: USFS



ATVs and Conservation Northwest

All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), and their cousins Off Road Vehicles (ORVs) and dirtbikes, have been all over the news in Eastern Washington as of late; from reports of illegal "mudding" damage in the Colville National Forest, to questions about a new state law, forest road policies and ATV use in the Teanaway Community Forest.

You may have also heard by now that Conservation Northwest and the Methow Valley Citizens' Council (MVCC) appealed the Okanogan County Commissioners' decision to triple the amount of roads open to ATVs in that county without a thoughtful environmental or community review.

But we believe strongly that with proper regulations, self-policing and analysis, there is a place for responsible ATV use and other motorized recreation in the great outdoors. Read our take on the issue, and why we've signed on to a letter with eleven other groups, including several all-terrain vehicle clubs and dealers, on our Scat! blog.



 




Visit our newsletters page for a paper or NEW FLIPBOOK version of our latest newsletter, "25 Years! You've kept it wild". Thanks for considering a donation to support our work.

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