Conservation Connection - February 2016 Click to view this email in a browser

February 2016

In this issue:

• Logging appeal
• Public lands
• Methow Headwaters
• Crossings protected
• Monitoring report
• Cougar video


 
When rainstorms and logging in burned areas mix, the results can be dangerous mudslides. Photo: George Wooten

When rainstorms and logging in burned areas mix, the results can be dangerous mudslides.
Photo: George Wooten




Appeal of state timber sale in burned area
This month we appealed a risky "salvage logging" timber sale on 1,200 acres of state forest lands burned during the 2015 Okanogan Complex Fire. Research has shown this type of logging dramatically boosts soil erosion, crushes regrowth, and undermines forest recovery and aquatic health. The proposed sale is in the Loup Loup Creek watershed, important spawning habitat for threatened steelhead trout.

What's more, last year a similar post-fire logging operation contributed to dangerous flooding and mudslides in nearby Texas Creek. Scientists have determined that after the 2015 wildfires the Loup Loup Creek area is already at "very high" risk of serious erosion and major damage to infrastructure and water quality. The environmental and community risks from this logging proposal are not worth the minimal financial gains it offers!

 
National forests, parks and wildlife refuges are for all of us to enjoy and a benefit from. We're working to keep them in public hands. Photo: Chase Gunnell

National forests, parks and wildlife refuges are for all of us to enjoy and benefit from. We're working to keep them in public hands.
Photo: Chase Gunnell



Keeping public lands in public hands
The seizure of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge by armed extremists is over. But the struggle to keep our nation's public lands in public hands is far from finished. America's natural heritage belongs to and benefits all of us. We'll continue working tirelessly to keep it that way.

Read more about the status, context and future of the public land grab movement in this perspective from Chase Gunnell, our Communications Manager.

 


The Methow Valley is home to vibrant communities and scenic landscapes rich with wildlife. This is not the place for a massive new mine. Photo: Methow Headwaters

The Methow Valley is home to vibrant communities and scenic landscapes rich with wildlife. This is not the place for a massive new mine.
Photo: Methow Headwaters



Protect the Methow Headwaters from mining
This month, our allies in the Methow Valley community launched the Methow Headwaters campaign, a grassroots effort to oppose a massive industrial copper mine proposed at Flagg Mountain near Mazama.

We have a Twisp office and many staffers and supporters that either live in the Methow Valley or cherish the area for its recreational opportunities and unique landscape, as well as its diverse fish and wildlife populations. The Methow's tight-knit community has our full support in fighting this destructive mining proposal. The U.S. Forest Service plans to announce a decision on exploratory drilling for this proposed mining operation this spring.

 


An impressive bull elk photographed near Crystal Springs and the I-90 wildlife overcrossing site. Photo: CWMP

An impressive bull elk photographed near Crystal Springs and the I-90 wildlife overcrossing site.
Photo: CWMP



State drops development proposal near wildlife crossings
Last month we shared an action alert about a risky Washington State Parks proposal to develop a lodge, conference center, RV park and up to 100 cabins on property immediately adjacent to where the Price/Noble I-90 Wildlife Overcrossing is now under construction. In a wonderful example of the power of public comments, this proposal has been dropped!

We applaud State Parks for recognizing the risks associated with such a development at this location. THANK YOU to all the agencies, organizations and activists who spoke up. Your voices have been heard! You can read more about the issue in this article from The Seattle Times.

 


A mature black bear inspects one of our

A mature black bear inspects one of our "run pole" wolverine camera stations in the North Cascades.
Photo: CWMP



Wildlife monitoring report now available
Our Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project has helped document the presence of rare and recovering wildlife in our region for over a decade. Check out our new 2015 field season report for details on what we found this year. Our monitoring results are also shared with our project's scientific advisers and other state, federal and tribal biologists across the Pacific Northwest.

From photographing endangered Canada lynx and wolves to charting the comeback of wolverines in the Cascades, this project informs conservation and land use policies that Northwest wildlife depend on. Please consider sponsoring a remote camera team or making a donation today to help keep this important project and our other science and conservation efforts running.

 


A family of cougars caught on remote camera in Washington's South Cascades. Photo: CWMP

A family of cougars caught on remote camera in Washington's South Cascades.
Photo: CWMP



Cougar family caught on camera
When our wildlife monitoring volunteers placed a trail camera at a small meadow in Washington's South Cascades last year, they had no idea that a family of cougars would spend several days visiting the site. Check out a neat video of this wildlife family here!

The mother cougar appeared to use the area as a "day-care" or rendezvous site for her cubs while she was off hunting. The cougars stuck around for nearly a week before heading off to new hunting grounds.

This remote camera site was set up in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in hopes of documenting gray wolves or wolverines as those species expand their range south of Snoqualmie Pass. Learn more about our Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project on our website.

 



Visit our newsletters page for a paper or NEW FLIPBOOK version of our latest newsletter, "Reaching Milestones: Making connections for wildlife".

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Conservation Northwest
1208 Bay Street #201, Bellingham, WA 98225
info@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
800.878.9950

 




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