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June 2013

In this issue:


To nest and rest, marbled murrelets prefer large areas of old forest. Photo: James P. Blair

To nest and rest, marbled murrelets prefer large areas of old forest.
Photo: James P. Blair




Protect Murrelets and Older Forests

Take action today urging the Department of Natural Resources to protect old forest for marbled murrelets, small, shy seabirds whose numbers are dropping drastically. The Pacific Northwest's old-growth forests give essential habitat to more than a thousand species and store more climate-warming carbon than most other forests in the world. Conserving older forest protects murrelets and more.

[Thank you for commenting by July 1 for old forest wildlife]

Wildlife poaching is on the rise in Washington, a reward fund and trainings help protect wildlife. Photo: Jay Kehne

Wildlife poaching is on the rise in Washington, a reward fund and trainings help protect wildlife.
Photo: Jay Kehne



Eyes in the Woods for Wildlife

Conservation Northwest has partnered with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife expanding an enforcement reward fund for poaching. The reward offers substantial sums leading to the arrest of anyone who illegally kills rare wildlife such as wolves, grizzly bears, and wolverines, or those involved in egregious events like spree killing of wildlife like deer and elk. Provide your eyes in the woods for wildlife.

[Why wolves need protection] ~ [Leavenworth, "Land of the Lost Wolves," 6/28]





Help choose which roads should stay open and which should be closed and left alone. Glacier Peak photo: Erin Moore

Help choose which roads should stay open and which should be closed and left alone.
Glacier Peak photo: Erin Moore



Sustainable Roads on the Mount-Baker Snoqualmie

You can help the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie plan for a sustainable road network on nearly 2 million acres of national forest in the Cascades. From Mount Rainier to the Canadian border, Conservation Northwest's forest restoration program identifies a balanced road network on public lands and rehabilitation of roads no longer needed. Attend one of a series of meetings to make your voice heard!

[Seattle 6/29 public meeting at REI] ~ [Next, Sedro-Woolley & Issaquah]



Wanted: You, to adopt a wildlife team of citizen monitors. American marten photo: Keith Possee

Wanted: You, to adopt a wildlife team of citizen monitors.
American marten photo: Keith Possee



Build a Brighter Future for I-90 Wildlife

With the Governor's signature on legislation, funding for a wildlife overpass in the I-90 Snoqualmie Pass East Project took center stage last month. The overpass has long been sought by Conservation Northwest and other members of the I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition to better connect wildlife habit in the Cascades. In 2014, the design will be finalized for our state's first wildlife overcrossing.

[See high school youths' winning 3D designs] ~ [Party to restore habitat!]




Visit our newsletters page for a paper or NEW FLIPBOOK version of our latest newsletter, "100 year vision: A Lake Whatcom forest park" Thanks for considering a donation to support our work.

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Conservation Northwest
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Conservation Northwest
1208 Bay St., #201
Bellingham, Washington 98225
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