Click to view this email in a browser

May 2014

In this issue:


Good times at the 2014 Hope for a Wild Future auction. Photo: Alex Crook

Good times at the 2014 Hope for a Wild Future auction.
Photo: Alex Crook




A BIG Thank You!

Whether it was bidding on auction items at our 25th anniversary auction, or making contributions during The Seattle Foundation's Give BIG day, our donors went above and beyond this month. It's clear we share a passion for conserving wildlife and wild lands in Washington and beyond. Thank you for your continued support and for helping us keep the Northwest wild!

Enjoy the exciting new Conservation Northwest video celebrating 25 years from our auction.

Conservation Northwest's Jay Kehne strings fladry along a fence, warning wolves away. Photo: Chase Gunnell

Conservation Northwest's Jay Kehne strings fladry along a fence, warning wolves away.
Photo: Chase Gunnell



Protecting Wolves and Livestock in the Teanaway

This past week Conservation Northwest volunteers and staff from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) strung nearly two miles of fladry around a pasture in the Teanaway Valley. These brightly colored flags are a centuries-old method of helping prevent wolf depredation on livestock, particularly young calves being reared in spring.

Learn more about the fladry project and hear from WDFW biologists and our wildlife program coordinators about why it's important in this news update.



 




Mazama mine would affect fish, wildlife – and people. Photo: NPS

Mazama mine would affect fish, wildlife – and people.
Photo: NPS



Protect Old Growth and Wild Fish in the Methow

A controversial copper mine proposal near Mazama needs more scrutiny. A Canadian mining company wants to conduct exploratory drilling near the iconic Flagg Mountain in the upper Methow Valley within an old-growth reserve and near spawning habitat for endangered native fish.

If approved, the company would run drills 24 hours a day for roughly five months. Drilling waste would be dumped, buried, and left behind. Please ask the Forest Service to conduct a careful and thorough environmental review of this project. Click here to send a comment to the USFS.

And if you live in the area, please attend the public hearing on the proposed mine on Monday, May 19 in Winthrop!



 



Underpasses beneath a well-traveled section of Hwy 97 are part of the plans. Photo: Rob Sinclair

Underpasses beneath a well-traveled section of Hwy 97 are part of the plans.
Photo: Rob Sinclair



Conservation Northwest is Working for Wildlife

A seven-year public-private effort by Conservation Northwest, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and a collective of regional partners, Working for Wildlife is a cutting-edge approach to linking critical habitat connections, particularly in the Okanogan Valley, between the Cascade Range and the Rocky Mountains in a vital corridor for Canada lynx, mule deer, bighorn sheep and sharp-tailed grouse.

We'll be working to mitigate wildlife and car collisions, sustain tourism activity in the region, and coordinating with local ranchers and farmers to promote habitat stewardship and maintain working lands. We look forward to collaborating with our partners on this exciting new project.



 



The migration of wild pink salmon is blocked by the now removed Elwha Dam in a scene from DamNation. Photo: Matt Stoecker

The migration of wild pink salmon is blocked by the now removed Elwha Dam in a scene from DamNation.
Photo: Matt Stoecker



Bellingham Screening of DamNation

The Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams have come down and wild salmon are spawning in the upper river for the first time in over a century. How did we get here? And what's next?

DamNation, a powerful film from Felt Soul Media, Stoecker Ecological, and Patagonia, explores the sea change in national attitudes from pride in big dams as engineering wonders to the growing awareness that our own future is bound to the life and health of our rivers.

Sponsored by Conservation Northwest, Save Our Wild Salmon, Sierra Club, American Whitewater, and WWU. Join us for the May 22 screening at the Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham!



 




Visit our newsletters page for a paper or NEW FLIPBOOK version of our latest newsletter, "Telling our stories: Protecting wildlife, connecting habitat." Thanks for considering a donation to support our work.

Visit us on the following social media platforms:

Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Google Plus

Conservation Northwest
1208 Bay Street #201, Bellingham, WA 98225
info@conservationnw.org
www.conservationnw.org
800.878.9950

You can also manage all your Conservation Northwest email subscriptions online.
Your membership expiration: 2008-10-30
Conservation Northwest does not share email information with third parties.

 




Warning: If you click No More Email, you will be removed from ALL lists. To from just THIS list, reply to this email with "Unsubscribe" in the subject line or use the mgmt link in msg above. No More Email

Click here to forward this email to a friend

Conservation Northwest
1208 Bay St., #201
Bellingham, Washington 98225
US

Read the VerticalResponse marketing policy.

Try Email Marketing with VerticalResponse!